Computational Model Library

A Generic Java Learning Classifier Library

Klaus Hufschlag | Published Fri Apr 9 09:24:12 2010 | Last modified Thu Feb 23 17:21:24 2017

Complete Library for object oriented development of Classifier Systems. See for the concept behind.

SimPLS - The PLS Agent

Iris Lorscheid Sandra Schubring Matthias Meyer Christian Ringle | Published Mon Apr 18 09:50:36 2016 | Last modified Tue May 17 11:35:16 2016

The simulation model SimPLS shows an application of the PLS agent concept, using SEM as empirical basis for the definition of agent architectures. The simulation model implements the PLS path model TAM about the decision of using innovative products.

The simulation model LAMDA investigates the influences of varying cognitive abilities of the decision maker on the truth-inducing effect of the Groves mechanism. Bounded rationality concepts are represented by information states and learning models.

Demand planning requires processing of distributed information. In this process, individuals, their properties and interactions play a crucial role. This model is a computational testbed to investigate these aspects with respect to forecast accuracy.

This model describes and analyses the outcomes of the confrontation of interests, some conflicting, some common, about the management of a small river in SW France

DITCH --- A Model of Inter-Ethnic Partnership Formation

Ruth Meyer Laurence Lessard-Phillips Huw Vasey | Published Wed Nov 5 18:07:16 2014 | Last modified Tue Feb 2 18:00:00 2016

The DITCH model has been developed to investigate partner selection processes, focusing on individual preferences, opportunities for contact, and group size to uncover how these may lead to differential rates of inter-­ethnic marriage.

The MML is a hybrid modeling environment that couples an agent-based model of small-holder agropastoral households and a cellular landscape evolution model that simulates changes in erosion/deposition, soils, and vegetation.

Multistate modeling extended by behavioral rules

Anna Klabunde Sabine Zinn Frans Willekens Matthias Leuchter | Published Wed Aug 3 20:19:13 2016 | Last modified Tue Mar 13 08:44:24 2018

Toolkit to specify demographic multistate model with a behavioural element linking intentions to behaviour

LaMEStModel

Ruth Meyer | Published Fri Oct 12 18:08:45 2018

The Labour Markets and Ethnic Segmentation (LaMESt) Model is a model of a simplified labour market, where only jobs of the lowest skill level are considered. Immigrants of two different ethnicities (“Latino”, “Asian”) compete with a majority (“White”) and minority (“Black”) native population for these jobs. The model’s purpose is to investigate the effect of ethnically homogeneous social networks on the emergence of ethnic segmentation in such a labour market. It is inspired by Waldinger & Lichter’s study of immigration and the social organisation of labour in 1990’s Los Angeles.

DiDIY Factory

Ruth Meyer | Published Tue Feb 20 14:19:44 2018

The DiDIY-Factory model is a model of an abstract factory. Its purpose is to investigate the impact Digital Do-It-Yourself (DiDIY) could have on the domain of work and organisation.

DiDIY can be defined as the set of all manufacturing activities (and mindsets) that are made possible by digital technologies. The availability and ease of use of digital technologies together with easily accessible shared knowledge may allow anyone to carry out activities that were previously only performed by experts and professionals. In the context of work and organisations, the DiDIY effect shakes organisational roles by such disintermediation of experts. It allows workers to overcome the traditionally strict organisational hierarchies by having direct access to relevant information, e.g. the status of machines via real-time information systems implemented in the factory.

A simulation model of this general scenario needs to represent a more or less abstract manufacturing firm with supervisors, workers, machines and tasks to be performed. Experiments with such a model can then be run to investigate the organisational structure –- changing from a strict hierarchy to a self-organised, seemingly anarchic organisation.

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