Computational Model Library

In this paper we introduce an agent-based model of elections and government formation where voters do not have perfect knowledge about the parties’ ideological position. Although voters are boundedly rational, they are forward-looking in that they try to assess the likely impact of the different parties over the resulting government. Thus, their decision rules combine sincere and strategic voting: they form preferences about the different parties but deem some of them as inadmissible and try to block them from office. We find that the most stable and durable coalition governments emerge at intermediate levels of informational ambiguity. When voters have very poor information about the parties, their votes are scattered too widely, preventing the emergence of robust majorities. But also, voters with highly precise perceptions about the parties will cluster around tiny electoral niches with a similar aggregate effect.

A land-use model to illustrate ambiguity in design

Julia Schindler | Published Mon Oct 15 14:57:13 2012 | Last modified Fri Jan 13 18:39:33 2017

This is an agent-based model that allows to test alternative designs for three model components. The model was built using the LUDAS design strategy, while each alternative is in line with the strategy. Using the model, it can be shown that alternative designs, though built on the same strategy, lead to different land-use patterns over time.

Intra-Organizational Bandwagon

Davide Secchi | Published Sun Oct 18 05:50:30 2015

The model simulates the process of widespread diffusion of something due to popularity (i.e., bandwagon) within an organization.

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