Computational Model Library

Studies of colonization processes in past human societies often use a standard population model in which population is represented as a single quantity. Real populations in these processes, however, are structured with internal classes or stages, and classes are sometimes created based on social differentiation. In this present work, information about the colonization of old Providence Island was used to create an agent-based model of the colonization process in a heterogeneous environment for a population with social differentiation. Agents were socially divided into two classes and modeled with dissimilar spatial clustering preferences. The model and simulations assessed the importance of gregarious behavior for colonization processes conducted in heterogeneous environments by socially-differentiated populations. Results suggest that in these conditions, the colonization process starts with an agent cluster in the largest and most suitable area. The spatial distribution of agents maintained a tendency toward randomness as simulation time increased, even when gregariousness values increased. The most conspicuous effects in agent clustering were produced by the initial conditions and behavioral adaptations that increased the agent capacity to access more resources and the likelihood of gregariousness. The approach presented here could be used to analyze past human colonization events or support long-term conceptual design of future human colonization processes with small social formations into unfamiliar and uninhabited environments.

Salzburg Bicycle model

Gudrun Wallentin | Published Sat Oct 29 19:38:25 2016

An ABM to simulate the spatio-temporal distribution of cyclists across the road network of the city of Salzburg.

Hominin Ecodynamics v.1.1 (update for perception and interaction)

C Michael Barton | Published Wed Aug 15 23:17:18 2012 | Last modified Sat Apr 27 20:18:34 2013

Models land-use, perception, and biocultural interactions between two forager populations.

Due to the large extent of the Harz National Park, an accurate measurement of visitor numbers and their spatiotemporal distribution is not feasible. This model demonstrates the possibility to simulate the streams of visitors with ABM methodology.

We seek to improve understanding of roles enzyme play in soil food webs. We created an agent-based simulation of a simple food web that includes enzymatic activity. The model was used in a publication, Moore et al. (in press; Biochemistry).

Hominin ecodynamics v.2

C Michael Barton | Published Mon Sep 19 19:55:00 2011 | Last modified Fri Mar 28 05:17:32 2014

Simulates biobehavioral interactions between 2 populations of hominins.

Three policy scenarios for urban expansion under the influences of the behaviours and decision modes of four agents and their interactions have been applied to predict the future development patterns of the Guangzhou metropolitan region.

Peer reviewed AZOI: Another Zone Of Influence model

Cyril Piou | Published Wed Jul 23 09:54:52 2014 | Last modified Thu Dec 11 21:26:34 2014

This model reimplement Weiner et al. 2001 Zone Of Influence model to simulate plant growth under competition. The reimplementation in Netlogo and the ODD description in the “info” tab try to be as consistent as possible with the original paper.

ForagerNet3_Demography: A Non-Spatial Model of Hunter-Gatherer Demography

Andrew White | Published Thu Oct 17 18:53:03 2013 | Last modified Thu Oct 17 19:13:37 2013

ForagerNet3_Demography is a non-spatial ABM for exploring hunter-gatherer demography. Key methods represent birth, death, and marriage. The dependency ratio is an imporant variable in many economic decisions embedded in the methods.

ForagerNet3_Demography_V2

Andrew White | Published Thu Feb 13 16:06:26 2014

ForagerNet3_Demography_V2 is a non-spatial ABM for exploring hunter-gatherer demography. This version (developed from FN3D_V1) contains code for calculating the ratio of old to young adults (the “OY ratio”) in the living and dead populations.

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