Community

Paul Smaldino Member since: Sunday, May 06, 2012

PhD

I am interested in the evolutionary, cultural, and psychological processes through which complex human organizational patterns emerge. My approach consists largely of developing and analyzing mathematical and computational models of dynamic populations, which are informed by research across many disciplines. Some areas of study closely related to my work include social and cultural evolution, social identity and group formation, mate choice, institutional mechanisms for cooperation, social and cultural constraints on decision making, cognition, biological pattern formation, agent-based modeling, and the philosophy of modeling.

pablo1999 Member since: Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Bachelor in Physics, Student in a Master Degree Program

Evolutionary Dynamics, Public Good Games, Emergence of Cooperation.

Bin-Tzong Chie Member since: Thursday, April 25, 2013

Dr.

Agent-Based Modeling

jcorrean Member since: Sunday, August 26, 2012

Licensure in Psychology, Master in Behavioral Research Methods, PhD Student in Science

Evolution of social behavior and complex systems

Yutaka NAKAI Member since: Sunday, November 24, 2019 Full Member

Professor of Shibaura Institute of Technology

Computational social science
especially, evolutionary simulation of a society

C Michael Barton Member since: Thursday, May 10, 2007 Full Member Reviewer

PhD University of Arizona (Anthropology/Geosciences), MA University of Arizona (Anthropology/Geosciences), BA University of Kansas (Anthropology)

My interests center around long-term human ecology and landscape dynamics with ongoing projects in the Mediterranean (late Pleistocene through mid-Holocene) and recent work in the American Southwest (Holocene-Archaic). I’ve done fieldwork in Spain, Bosnia, and various locales in North America and have expertise in hunter/gatherer and early farming societies, geoarchaeology, lithic technology, and evolutionary theory, with an emphasis on human/environmental interaction, landscape dynamics, and techno-economic change.

Quantitative methods are critical to archaeological research, and socioecological sciences in general. They are an important focus of my research, especially emphasizing dynamic modeling, spatial technologies (including GIS and remote sensing), statistical analysis, and visualization. I am a member of the open source GRASS GIS international development team that is making cutting edge spatial technologies available to researchers and students around the world.

Yifei Wang Member since: Saturday, February 25, 2017 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D in Computing, M.Eng. in Astronautics Engineering, B.Eng. Computer Science & Technology

Timothy Gooding Member since: Wednesday, May 15, 2013

BA Economics, York University Canada, PhD Economics Kingston University London

After being the economic development officer for the Little/Salmon Carmacks First Nation, Tim used all his spare time trying to determine a practical understanding of the events he witnessed. This led him to complexity, specifically human emergent behaviour and the evolutionary prerequisites present in human society. These prerequisites predicted many of the apparently immutable ‘modern problems’ in society. First, he tried disseminating the knowledge in popular book form, but that failed – three times. He decided to obtain PhD to make his ‘voice’ louder. He chose sociology, poorly as it turns out as he was told his research had ‘no academic value whatsoever’. After being forced out of University, he taught himself agent-based modelling to demonstrate his ideas and published his first peer-reviewed paper without affiliation while working as a warehouse labourer. Subsequently, he managed to interest Steve Keen in his ideas and his second attempt at a PhD succeeded. His most recent work involves understanding the basic forces generated by trade in a complex system. He is most interested in how the empirically present evolutionary prerequisites impact market patterns.

Economics, society, complexity, systems, ecosystem, thermodynamics, agent-based modelling, emergent behaviour, evolution.

Antonio Carvajal-Rodriguez Member since: Wednesday, April 15, 2015

PhD genetics, Computer Systems Engineer

I am interested in the interface between biology and computation. I am especially focused on modelling and simulation of evolutionary processes.

Timothy Dennehy Member since: Monday, March 11, 2013

BA Psychology, MA Anthropology

Prehistoric archaeology of hunter-gatherer societies in Mesoamerica and American Southeast; comparative analysis of urban form and service provision; social inequality; complex adaptive systems; cultural evolution.

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