Community

Rubén Darío Villota Galeano Member since: Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Researcher in Computational Social Sciences

Computational Social Sciences

Xiaoyi Yuan Member since: Monday, January 30, 2017

PhD in Computational Social Science

Noha Nagi Member since: Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Bachelor in statistics, Preparing MSC in social science computing

Christopher Thron Member since: Saturday, November 07, 2015

Ph.D. in physics, University of Kentucky, Ph.D. in mathematics, University of Wisconsin

Mathematical modeling and simulation in social sciences, biology, physics, and signal processing.

Klaus G. Troitzsch Member since: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 Full Member

Klaus G. Troitzsch was a full professor of computer applications in the social sciences at the University of Koblenz-Landau since 1986 until he officially retired in 2012 (but continues his academic activities). He took his first degree as a political scientist. After eight years in active politics in Hamburg and after having taken his PhD, he returned to academia, first as a senior researcher in an election research project at the University of Koblenz-Landau, from 1986 as full professor of computer applications in the social sciences. His main interests in teaching and research are social science methodology and, especially, modelling and simulation in the social sciences.
Among his early research projects there is the MIMOSE project which developed a declarative functional simulation language and tool for micro and multilevel simulation between 1986 and 1992. Several EU funded projects were devoted to social simulation and policy modelling, the most recent from 2012 to 2015 combining data/text mining and agent-based simulation to analyse the global dynamics of extortion racket systems.
He authored, co-authored, and co-edited several books and many articles in social simulation, and he organised or co-organised a number of national and international conferences in this field. Over nearly three decades he advised and/or supervised more than 55 PhD theses, most of them in the field of social simulation. He offered annual summer and spring courses in social simulation between 1997 and 2009; more recent courses of this kind are now being organised by the European Social Simulation Assiciation and held at different places all over Europe (mostly with his contributions).

Computational social science, structuralist theory reconstruction

Rocco Paolillo Member since: Monday, September 24, 2018 Full Member

BIGSSS-Departs PhD Fellow
Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences / Jacobs University (Germany)
PhD project: Residential Segregation and Intergenerational Immigrant Integration: A Schelling-Esser Model

Italian PhD fellow, fond of social complexity and agent-based modeling, applied to residential segregation and integration processes

Research Interests: Agent-based modeling, migrant integration, residential segregation

Hawal Shamon Member since: Friday, January 22, 2016

Economics & Sociology, Social Science

David Earnest Member since: Saturday, March 13, 2010 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. in political science (2004), M.A. in security policy studies (1994)

Two themes unite my research: a commitment to methodological creativity and innovation as expressed in my work with computational social sciences, and an interest in the political economy of “globalization,” particularly its implications for the ontological claims of international relations theory.

I have demonstrated how the methods of computational social sciences can model bargaining and social choice problems for which traditional game theory has found only indeterminate and multiple equilibria. My June 2008 article in International Studies Quarterly (“Coordination in Large Numbers,” vol. 52, no. 2) illustrates that, contrary to the expectation of collective action theory, large groups may enjoy informational advantages that allow players with incomplete information to solve difficult three-choice coordination games. I extend this analysis in my 2009 paper at the International Studies Association annual convention, in which I apply ideas from evolutionary game theory to model learning processes among players faced with coordination and commitment problems. Currently I am extending this research to include social network theory as a means of modeling explicitly the patterns of interaction in large-n (i.e. greater than two) player coordination and cooperation games. I argue in my paper at the 2009 American Political Science Association annual convention that computational social science—the synthesis of agent-based modeling, social network analysis and evolutionary game theory—empowers scholars to analyze a broad range of previously indeterminate bargaining problems. I also argue this synthesis gives researchers purchase on two of the central debates in international political economy scholarship. By modeling explicitly processes of preference formation, computational social science moves beyond the rational actor model and endogenizes the processes of learning that constructivists have identified as essential to understanding change in the international system. This focus on the micro foundations of international political economy in turn allows researchers to understand how social structural features emerge and constrain actor choices. Computational social science thus allows IPE to formalize and generalize our understandings of mutual constitution and systemic change, an observation that explains the paradoxical interest of constructivists like Ian Lustick and Matthew Hoffmann in the formal methods of computational social science. Currently I am writing a manuscript that develops these ideas and applies them to several challenges of globalization: developing institutions to manage common pool resources; reforming capital adequacy standards for banks; and understanding cascading failures in global networks.

While computational social science increasingly informs my research, I have also contributed to debates about the epistemological claims of computational social science. My chapter with James N. Rosenau in Complexity in World Politics (ed. by Neil E. Harrison, SUNY Press 2006) argues that agent-based modeling suffers from underdeveloped and hidden epistemological and ontological commitments. On a more light-hearted note, my article in PS: Political Science and Politics (“Clocks, Not Dartboards,” vol. 39, no. 3, July 2006) discusses problems with pseudo-random number generators and illustrates how they can surprise unsuspecting teachers and researchers.

Meysam Alizadeh Member since: Sunday, March 18, 2012 Full Member Reviewer

PhD in Computational Social Science

Mason Wright Member since: Thursday, October 24, 2013

agent-based modeling
social science simulation
computational economics

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