Community

Uzair Ahmad Member since: Thursday, February 26, 2015

PhD, MIT

Complex Adaptive Systems, Data Analytics and Visualization

Kenneth Aiello Member since: Thursday, January 23, 2020 Full Member

Ph.D., Biology and Society, Arizona State University, B.S., Sociology, Arizona State University,, B.S., Biology, Arizona State University

Kenneth D. Aiello is a postdoctoral research scholar with the Global BioSocial Complexity Initiative at ASU. Kenneth’s research contributes to cross disciplinary conversations on how historical developments in biological, social, and cultural knowledge systems are governed by processes that transform the structure, dynamics, and function of complex systems. Applying computational historical analysis and epistemology to question what scientific knowledge is and how we can analyze changes in knowledge, he uses text analysis, social network analysis, and machine learning to measure similarities and differences between the knowledge claims of individual agents and groups. His work builds on how to assess contested knowledge claims and measure the evolution of knowledge across complex systems and multiple dimensions of scale. This approach also engages in dynamic new debates about global and local structures of knowledge shaped by technological innovation within microbiology related to public policy, shrinking resources given to biomedical ideas as opposed to “translation”, and the ethics of scientific discovery. Using interdisciplinary methods for understanding historical content and context rich narratives contributes to understanding new domains and major transitions in science and provides a richer understanding of how knowledge emerges.

Klaus G. Troitzsch Member since: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 Full Member

Klaus G. Troitzsch was a full professor of computer applications in the social sciences at the University of Koblenz-Landau since 1986 until he officially retired in 2012 (but continues his academic activities). He took his first degree as a political scientist. After eight years in active politics in Hamburg and after having taken his PhD, he returned to academia, first as a senior researcher in an election research project at the University of Koblenz-Landau, from 1986 as full professor of computer applications in the social sciences. His main interests in teaching and research are social science methodology and, especially, modelling and simulation in the social sciences.
Among his early research projects there is the MIMOSE project which developed a declarative functional simulation language and tool for micro and multilevel simulation between 1986 and 1992. Several EU funded projects were devoted to social simulation and policy modelling, the most recent from 2012 to 2015 combining data/text mining and agent-based simulation to analyse the global dynamics of extortion racket systems.
He authored, co-authored, and co-edited several books and many articles in social simulation, and he organised or co-organised a number of national and international conferences in this field. Over nearly three decades he advised and/or supervised more than 55 PhD theses, most of them in the field of social simulation. He offered annual summer and spring courses in social simulation between 1997 and 2009; more recent courses of this kind are now being organised by the European Social Simulation Assiciation and held at different places all over Europe (mostly with his contributions).

Computational social science, structuralist theory reconstruction

Joseph A. E. Shaheen Member since: Wednesday, April 01, 2020 Full Member

Ph.D., Computational Social Science, George Mason University, MBA, Georgetown University, BSc, Engineering:Physics, Murray State University

Joseph is an Intelligence Community Postdoc Fellow (ODNI/NCTC) co-located with the faculty of the Department of Computational and Data Sciences at George Mason University. Since his first day of university training at age 15 and having earned his undergraduate degree in Engineering:Physics at age 19, his 15 years of industry experience has been diverse, ranging from industrial engineering to people analytics.

Dr. Shaheen earned his doctorate in Computational Social Science from GMU with a dissertation on economic policy and population-scale data analysis of Internal Revenue Service records. There, he studied all U.S. firms from a biologically-grounded perspective under the guidance of Professor Rob Axtell’s research group.

Following his U.S. State Department-funded assignment with the NATO STRATCOM Centre of Excellence where he conducted large scale analysis and provided policy recommendations in the fight against ISIS/ISIL/Daesh, he has been a guest speaker on issues of Information and \textit{Social Media Warfare}–a term closely associated with his 2015 NATO report–at the Pentagon (J-39 SMA), NATO Defense Against Terrorism COE, National Defense University, OMCC and others.

A life-long scholar, Joe has received training from academic leaders in Social Network Analysis and has been recognized as an honorary Links Center Fellow in 2015 and by GMU’s Teaching Excellence award in 5 consecutive iterations.

He has appeared on CNN HLN, FOX NEWS, NBC News, Entrepreneur Magazine and has been invited to participate in the 2020 (postponed to 2021) Heidelberg Laureate Forum (Heidelberg, Germany) where he will spend time with fellow scholars of the mathematical and computer sciences as well as Fields Medal, Abel Prize, Turing Award, and Nevanlinna prize winners.

In his free time, Joe enjoys a sense of humor and practices portrait, landscape and wildlife photography. Even so - he admits, he has never been able to successfully take one decent photo of himself

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