Community

Francisco J. León-Medina Member since: Tuesday, June 05, 2018

Analytical Sociology; Social Mechanisms; ABMs; Opinion Dynamics

Reinier Van Der Veen Member since: Wednesday, August 26, 2015

MSc., PhD

Researcher in sustainable production and consumption, the service economy, energy markets, and electricity balancing mechanisms.

John Bradford Member since: Tuesday, November 04, 2014

Ph.D. Sociology, University of Tennessee

Currently working on agent-based modeling of wealth and income distributions; formalizing some of Luhmann’s theories of communication; modeling social norms; and modeling generative mechanisms of status hierarchies.

Harsha Krishna Member since: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 Full Member

I develop simulation tools for generating what-if scenarios for decision making. I predominantly use Agent-Based Modelling (ABM) technique as most of my simulations model complex systems. In some cases, I have extended existing tools with modifications to model the given system. Although the tools are meant for research purposes, I have followed industry friendly delivery mechanisms, such as unit-tests, autmated builds and delivery on cloud platforms.

  • Agent-Based Modelling
  • Complex Social Systems
  • Gaming-Simulations

Oscar Montes De Oca Member since: Monday, September 09, 2013 Full Member Reviewer

Masters of Applied Science, Massey University, New Zealand, Diploma in Manufacturing, ITESM, Mexico, Bachelors in Industrial Engineering, ITESM, Mexico

I have developed several agent-based and cellular automata applications combining agent-based modelling, geographical information systems and visualisation to understand the complex mechanisms of decision making in land use change and environmental stewardship in order to analyse:
• the role of pastoral agriculture in regional development,
• the tradeoffs between land use intensification and water quality,
• the adoption of land-based climate change mitigation practices, and
• the incorporation of cultural values into spatial futures or scenario modelling.

Lisa Frazier Member since: Thursday, October 08, 2015

MPH, PhD Candidate

My research interests include policy informatics and decision making, modeling in policy analysis and management decisions, public health management and policy, and the role of public value in policy development. I am particularly interested in less mainstream approaches to modeling that account for learning, feedback, and other systems dynamics. I include Bayesian inference, agent-based models, and behavioral assumptions in both my research and teaching.
In my dissertation research, I conceptualize state Medicaid programs as complex adaptive systems characterized by diverse actors, behaviors, relationships, and objectives. These systems reproduce themselves through both strategic and emergent mechanisms of program management. I focus on the mechanism by which citizens are sorted into or out of the system: program enrollment. Using Bayesian regression and agent-based models, I explore the role of administrative practices (such as presumptive eligibility and longer continuous eligibility periods) in increasing enrollment of eligible citizens into Medicaid programs.

Corinna Elsenbroich Member since: Wednesday, January 18, 2017

PhD Computer Science

Corinna is a lecturer in the Department of Sociology. She joined the Centre for Research in Social Simulation at the in August 2008 as a Research Fellow. Her academic background is in Philosophy (LSE, BSc MSc) and Computer Science (KCL,PhD), where her PhD Instinct for Detection developed a logic for abductive reasoning.

Currently Corinna is the PI on an AHRC Research Grant on collective reasoning in agent-based modelling, titled Collective Reasoning as a Moral Point of View. Her research interests are decision mechanisms, in particular collective decision-making, context dependency of decisions and methodological and epistemological aspects of agent-based modelling and social simulation. She has applied collective decision making to the analysis to the weakening of the Mafia in Southern Italy within the GLODERS project and published a book Modelling Norms, co-authored with Nigel Gilbert, providing a systematic analysis of the contribution of agent-based modelling to the study of social norms and deviant behaviour. Recently Corinna has been developing a teaching stream within CRESS with a periodically running short course Agent-based Modelling for the Social Scientist and the MSc Social Science and Complexity.

Derek Robinson Member since: Wednesday, November 05, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

The goal of my research program is to improve our understanding about highly integrated natural and human processes. Within the context of Land-System Science, I seek to understand how natural and human systems interact through feedback mechanisms and affect land management choices among humans and ecosystem (e.g., carbon storage) and biophysical processes (e.g., erosion) in natural systems. One component of this program involves finding novel methods for data collection (e.g., unmanned aerial vehicles) that can be used to calibrate and validate models of natural systems at the resolution of decision makers. Another component of this program involves the design and construction of agent-based models to formalize our understanding of human decisions and their interaction with their environment in computer code. The most exciting, and remaining part, is coupling these two components together so that we may not only quantify the impact of representing their coupling, but more importantly to assess the impacts of changing climate, technology, and policy on human well-being, patterns of land use and land management, and ecological and biophysical aspects of our environment.

To achieve this overarching goal, my students and I conduct fieldwork that involves the use of state-of-the-art unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in combination with ground-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR) equipment, RTK global positioning system (GPS) receivers, weather and soil sensors, and a host of different types of manual measurements. We bring these data together to make methodological advancements and benchmark novel equipment to justify its use in the calibration and validation of models of natural and human processes. By conducting fieldwork at high spatial resolutions (e.g., parcel level) we are able to couple our representation of natural system processes at the scale at which human actors make decisions and improve our understanding about how they react to changes and affect our environment.

land use; land management; agricultural systems; ecosystem function; carbon; remote sensing; field measurements; unmanned aerial vehicle; human decision-making; erosion, hydrological, and agent-based modelling

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