Computational Model Library

St Anthony flu

Lisa Sattenspiel | Published Mon Apr 15 20:40:30 2019

The St Anthony flu model is an epidemiological model designed to test hypotheses related to the spread of the 1918 influenza pandemic among residents of a small fishing community in Newfoundland and Labrador. The 1921 census data from Newfoundland and Labrador are used to ensure a realistic model population; the community of St. Anthony, NL, located on the tip of the Northern Peninsula of the island of Newfoundland is the specific population modeled. Model agents are placed on a map-like grid that consists of houses, two churches, a school, an orphanage, a hospital, and several boats. They engage in daily activities that reflect known ethnographic patterns of behavior in St. Anthony and other similar communities. A pathogen is introduced into the community and then it spreads throughout the population as a consequence of individual agent movements and interactions.

The Cardial Spread Model

Sean Bergin | Published Fri Sep 29 18:53:33 2017 | Last modified Mon Feb 4 20:35:27 2019

The purpose of this model is to provide a platform to test and compare four conceptual models have been proposed to explain the spread of the Impresso-Cardial Neolithic in the west Mediterranean.

Neolithic Spread Model Version 1.0

Sean Bergin Michael Barton Salvador Pardo Gordo Joan Bernabeu Auban | Published Thu Dec 11 19:12:19 2014 | Last modified Mon Dec 31 17:39:18 2018

This model simulates different spread hypotheses proposed for the introduction of agriculture on the Iberian peninsula. We include three dispersal types: neighborhood, leapfrog, and ideal despotic distribution (IDD).

Peninsula_Iberica 1.0

Carolina Cucart-Mora Sergi Lozano Javier Fernández-López De Pablo | Published Fri Nov 4 10:14:33 2016 | Last modified Mon Nov 27 09:36:32 2017

This model was build to explore the bio-cultural interaction between AMH and Neanderthals during the Middle to Upper Paleolithic Transition in the Iberian Peninsula

This website uses cookies and Google Analytics to help us track user engagement and improve our site. If you'd like to know more information about what data we collect and why, please see our data privacy policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies.