Community

Rachel Baker Member since: Friday, May 23, 2014

Educational inequality, higher education

Timothy Dennehy Member since: Monday, March 11, 2013

BA Psychology, MA Anthropology

Prehistoric archaeology of hunter-gatherer societies in Mesoamerica and American Southeast; comparative analysis of urban form and service provision; social inequality; complex adaptive systems; cultural evolution.

Augusto Cabrera-Becerril Member since: Friday, June 16, 2017

MSc (Mathematics), Bc(Mathematics)

Cervical cancer, Social Inequality, Epidemiology

E Larsen Member since: Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Masters degree in Sociology

Social inequality, ethnic segregation, computational sociology.

Sabine Zinn Member since: Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Dr.

Development and usage of demographic microsimulation tools and applications, in particular mate-matching and statistical modeling as well as analysis of output

Jayaprakash Jeyaraju Member since: Monday, October 24, 2016

Bachelor of Engineering, Master of Engineering, Doctor of Philosophy

Did some work in Multi-agent modeling for inventory routing problem using JADE. doing Research application Multi-agent modeling in Supply chain management with Internet of Things, Networked manufacturing

Károly Takács Member since: Monday, October 20, 2014

PhD

My main research interests are the theoretical and experimental analysis of the dynamics of social networks, in relation to problems of cooperation and conflict.

Simone Righi Member since: Friday, June 08, 2018

I received a Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Namur (Belgium) in June 2012 with a thesis titled “Essays in Information Aggregation and Political Economics”.
After two years at the Research Center for Educational and Network Studies (Recens) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, I joined the Department of Economics “Marco Biagi” of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in January 2015 and then the Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences of the University of Bologna.
I am currently a Lecturer in Financial Computing at the Department Computer Science (Financial Computing and Analytics group) - University College London. Moreover I am an affiliated researcher of the DYNAMETS - Dynamic Systems Analysis for Economic Theory and Society research group and an affiliate member of the Namur Center for Complex Systems (Naxys).

My research interests concern the computational study of financial markets (microstructure, systemic properties and behavioral bias), of social Interactions on complex networks (theory and experiments), the evolution of cooperation in networks (theory and experiments) and the study of companies strategies in the digital economy.

Andrew Gillreath-Brown Member since: Thursday, July 25, 2019 Full Member

A.S., Pre-Engineering, Wallace State Community College, B.S., Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Freed-Hardeman University, B.A., Religious Studies, Freed-Hardeman University, B.A., Anthropology, Middle Tennessee State University, M.S., Applied Geography: Environmental Archaeology, University of North Texas

I am a computational archaeologist interested in how individuals and groups respond to both large scale processes such as climate change and local processes such as violence and wealth inequality. I am currently a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Washington State University.

My dissertation research focuses on experimenting with paleoecological data (e.g., pollen) to assess whether or not different approaches are feasible for paleoclimatic field reconstructions. In addition, I will also use pollen data to generate vegetation (biome) reconstructions. By using tree-ring and pollen data, we can gain a better understanding of the paleoclimate and the spatial distribution of vegetation communities and how those changed over time. These data can be used to better understand changes in demography and how people responded to environmental change.

In Summer 2019, I attended the Santa Fe Institute‘s Complex Systems Summer School, where I got to work in a highly collaborative and interdisciplinary international scientific community. For one of my projects, I got to merry my love of Sci-fi with complexity and agent-based modeling. Sci-fi agent-based modeling is an anthology and we wanted to build a community of collaborators for exploring sci-fi worlds. We also have an Instagram page (@Scifiabm).

Bruce Edmonds Member since: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 Full Member Reviewer

BA(Hons) Mathematics, Oxford, 1983, PhD in Philosophy of Science, Manchester 1999

I studied Mathematics at Oxford (1979-1983) then did youth work in inner city areas for the Educational Charity. After teaching in Grenada in the West Indies we came back to the UK, where the first job I could get was in a 6th form college (ages 16-18). They sent me to do post16 PCGE, which was so boring that I also started a part-time PhD. The PhD was started in 1992 and was on the meaning and definition of the idea of “complexity”, which I had been pondering for a few years. Given the growth of the field of complexity from that time, I had great fun reading almost anything in the library but I did finally finish it in 1999. Fortunately I got a job at the Centre for Policy Modelling (CfPM) in 1994 with its founder and direction, Scott Moss. We were doing agent-based social simulation then, but did not know it was called this and did not meet other such simulators for a few years. With Scott Moss we built the CfPM into one of the leading research centres in agent-based social simulation in the world. I became director of the CfPM just before Scott retired, and later became Professor of Social Simulation in 2013. For more about me see http://bruce.edmonds.name or http://cfpm.org.

All aspects of social simulation including: techniques, tools, applications, philosophy, methodology and interesting examples. Understanding complex social systems. Context-dependency and how it affects interaction and cognition. Complexity and how this impacts upon simulation modelling. Social aspects of cognition - or to put it another way - the social embedding of intelligence. Simulating how science works. Integrating qualitative evidence better into ABMs. And everything else.

This website uses cookies and Google Analytics to help us track user engagement and improve our site. If you'd like to know more information about what data we collect and why, please see our data privacy policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies.