Community

Jesús Zamarreño Member since: Thursday, June 12, 2014

PhD in Physics

Use of ABM in areas related to Systems Engineering and Automatic Control.

Ismael Chaile Member since: Wednesday, December 11, 2013 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. with research line in Multi-agent systems and Distributed systems (robots, IoT), Master In Science in Micro and Nanoelectronic, Master in General Direcction and Strategic Planning, Electronic Engineer

I have been researching in synchronization between agent-based-models (ABM) and multi robot systems used in logistic and manufacturing. I use Netlogo as ABM.
I develop and agile methodology to use the same ABM as supervisory control and data aquisition (SCADA). The framework works fine and I test it in two SCADAs, which you can see in my youtube channel (http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJIb_UL-ak98F5OZxOHL0FQ).

Andrea Rizzoli Member since: Wednesday, March 06, 2013

PhD Control Engineering, MSc Control Engineering

Environmental modelling and simulation

Jay Bancroft Member since: Tuesday, July 29, 2014

PhD

population invasion and biological control

Haizhong Wang Member since: Friday, February 20, 2015

PhD

agent-based modeling and simulation, traffic control and operation, emergency evacuation and disaster response

Daniyal Jahangir Member since: Tuesday, October 22, 2013

MS in Chemical & Biological Engineering

Membrane biofouling control in MBR systems by employing encapsulated quorum quenching bacteria

Scott Bosokvich Member since: Friday, November 10, 2017

Ph.D. Electrical Engineering Intelligent Systems, M.S. Electrical Engineering, B.S. Electrical Computer Engineering

Distributed cooperative and collaborative Autonomous Vehicle Control

Shelby Manney Member since: Friday, September 26, 2014

BA - English, BS - Anthropology (Archaeoinformatics - GIS, Applied Stats, Data Mang.,CRM CERT), BFA - Music, BA - Writing & Rhetoric, MA - Technical, Professional, & Science Writing (TPSW - Cert), MS - Cultural Studies in Applied Sciences (Philosophy of Science - Archaeology/Semiotics Focus), MA - Anthropology

General Question:
Without Central Control is self organization possible?

Specific Case:

Considering the seemingly preplanned, densely aggregated communities of the prehistoric Puebloan Southwest, is it possible that without centralized authority (control), that patches of low-density communities dispersed in a bounded landscape could quickly self-organize and construct preplanned, highly organized, prehistoric villages/towns?

Francesc Bellaubi Member since: Thursday, June 27, 2013

PhD candidate

performance of urban water service provision, high levels of inequities and inefficiency persist. In terms of water distribution and cost, these undesirable patterns have a high impact on peri-urban areas usually populated by marginalized and poor populations. The high levels of Non-Revenue Water (NRW), together with the existence of corrupt practices and mismanagement of water utilities, remain a highly controversial issue.

This situation confronts rent-seeking theory directly, explaining the performance-corruption relationship (Repetto, 1986). The presumption is that low performance in water supply service provision results from corruption because rent-seeking occurs. Hence, the implementation of performance-oriented reforms in the water supply sector, such as regulation or private sector participation, will reduce corruption, increasing the efficiency of water service provision. Nevertheless, latest evidence shows that “key elements of good political governance have a positive effect on the access to water services in developing countries. In turn, private sector participation has little influence other than increasing internal efficiency of water providers” (Krausse, 2009).

Indeed the relation between governance, corruption and performance seems to be more complex than theory wants to acknowledge. It must be reviewed further than a simple cause-effect relationship. It appears that poor management of water utilities, evidenced by high levels of NRW, justifies new investments. Such practices can be encouraged by an “opportunistic management”, whilst at the same time maintaining an influential “hydrocratic elite” in the sphere of water control.

The present research proposal aims to understand the relation between mismanagement and corruption of water control practices in water supply service provision. The research examines how this relationship affects the performance of water service provision and relates to water supply governance models at municipal peri-urban level in three African countries.

To understand the mismanagement-corruption relationship, we look at different case studies of water supply service provision in Senegal, Ghana and Kenya. Each case represents a different governance model in terms of management practices, institutional and organizational settings, and the actors in place, which affects the performance of water service provision in terms of allocative efficiency and access to water (equity). Whether regulation, decentralization and private sector participation constitute possible ways to reduce corruption is examined in the context of water sector reform.

In a second step, we propose a theoretical model based on Agent Based Modelling (ABM) (Pahl-Wostl, 2007) to reproduce complex social networks under a Socio-Ecological System (SES) framework approach. The model will allow us to test whether collaborative governance in the form of collective action in a participatory and negotiated decision-making process for water control, can reduce corruption and increase performance.

The present research benefits from the project “Transparency and Integrity in Service Delivery in Sub-Saharan Africa”. This project, carried out by Transparency International (TI) in 8 Sub-Saharan countries, aims to increase access to education, health and water by improving transparency and integrity in basic service delivery. The proposal retains focus on Senegal, Ghana and Kenya in the water sector.

Key words: water control, mismanagement, corruption, performance, collaborative governance, modelling, collective action, negotiation, participation

Andrew Bell Member since: Thursday, January 23, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

PhD, Natural Resource Management, University of Michigan

Andrew Bell (Ph.D. 2010, Michigan) was a Research Fellow in the Environment and Production Technology Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, DC. His current research portfolio focuses on the use of field instruments – such as discrete choice experiments, framed field experiments, randomized control trials – to inform behavior in agent-based models of coupled human-natural systems. Prior to this post, Andrew was a post-doctoral research fellow at The Earth Institute at Columbia University, where he focused on developing applications for paleo-climate histories.

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