Community

Ifigeneia Koutiva Member since: Monday, June 21, 2010 Full Member

PhD in Civil Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, M.Sc. in Environmental Technology, Imperial College London, Postgraduate Diploma in Water Resources and Environmental Management (online), University of Belgrade, Mining and Metallurgy Engineering, National Technical University of Athens

Ifigeneia Koutiva (female) is a senior environmental engineer, holding a PhD in Civil Engineering (NTUA), a Postgrad Diploma in Water Resources and Environmental Management (Un. of Belgrade - e-learning), an MSc in Environmental Technology (Imperial College London) and an MSc in Mining and Metallurgy Engineering (NTUA). Her PhD was funded by the Greek Ministry of Education through Heracleitous II scholarship. She has 10 years of experience in various EU funded research projects, both as a researcher and as a project manager, in the fields of socio-technical simulation, urban water modelling, modelling and assessment of alternative water technologies, social quantitative research, KPI and water indicators development and assessment and analysis of large data sets. She is very competent with programming for creating ICT tools for agent based modelling and data analysis tools and she is an experienced user of spatial analysis
software and tools. Being actively involved in the design and implementation of numerous consultation workshops and conferences, she has gained significant expertise on developing participatory approaches addressing to the civil society and other stakeholders.

My research interests lay within the interface of social, water and modelling sciences. I have created tools that explore the effects of water demand management policies in domestic urban water demand behaviour and the effects of civil decision making in flood risk management. I am interested in agent based modelling, participatory methods, the creation of ABM tools for civil society, Circular Economy, distributed water technologies and overall urban water management.

Danilo Freire Member since: Sunday, May 10, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

MA in Political Science, University of São Paulo, MSc in International Relations, Graduate Institute Geneva, PhD in Political Economy, King's College London

dgweb121 Member since: Thursday, October 20, 2011

Ph.D. Political Economy and Public Policy, MA Economics

Reinier Van Der Veen Member since: Wednesday, August 26, 2015

MSc., PhD

Researcher in sustainable production and consumption, the service economy, energy markets, and electricity balancing mechanisms.

Tom Brughmans Member since: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

PhD in Archaeology, University of Southampton (completion 13-10-2014), MSc Archaeological Computing (Spatial Technologies), University of Southampton, MA Archaeology, University of Leuven, BA Archaeology of Syro-Palestine, University of Leuven

My research aims to explore the potential of network science for the archaeological discipline. In my review work I confront the use of network-based methods in the archaeological discipline with their use in other disciplines, especially sociology and physics. In my archaeological work I aim to develop and apply network science techniques that show particular potential for archaeology. This is done through a number of archaeological case-studies: archaeological citation networks, visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman southern Spain, and tableware distribution in the Roman Eastern Mediterranean.

Robi Ragan Member since: Monday, February 18, 2013 Full Member Reviewer

PhD. Economics, MA Political Science

My research centers on isolating how and to what extent political institutions themselves shape policy. I use computational modeling (agent-based and simulation) to gain theoretical leverage on the issue. This approach allows me to place groups of actors with given preferences into different institutional settings in order to gauge the effect of the rules of the game on political outcomes. Most of my research examines the ways in which legislative processes affect issues of political economy, such as income redistribution.

Matteo Richiardi Member since: Wednesday, February 01, 2017

PhD

Matteo Richiardi is an internationally recognised scholar in  micro-simulation modelling (this includes dynamic microsimulations and agent-based modelling). His work on micro-simulations involves both methodological research on estimation and validation techniques, and applications to the analysis of distributional outcomes, the functioning of the labour market and welfare systems. He is Chief Editor of the International Journal of Microsimulation. Examples of his work are the two recent books “Elements of Agent-based Computational Economics”, published by Cambridge University Press (2016), and “The political economy of work security and flexibility: Italy in comparative perspective”, published by Policy Press (2012).

Omar Guerrero Member since: Friday, January 30, 2015

PhD

My interests lie in the intersection of economics, networks, and computation. I am currently studying labour dynamics as a process where people flow throughout the economy by moving from one firm to another. I study these flows by looking at detailed data about employment histories of each individual and every firm in entire economies. Using this information, I construct networks of firms in order to map the roads that people take throughout their careers. This allows to study labour markets at an unprecedented fine-grained level of detail. I employ agent-based computing methods to understand how economic shocks and policies alter labour flows, which eventually translate into unemployment and other related problems.

David Earnest Member since: Saturday, March 13, 2010 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. in political science (2004), M.A. in security policy studies (1994)

Two themes unite my research: a commitment to methodological creativity and innovation as expressed in my work with computational social sciences, and an interest in the political economy of “globalization,” particularly its implications for the ontological claims of international relations theory.

I have demonstrated how the methods of computational social sciences can model bargaining and social choice problems for which traditional game theory has found only indeterminate and multiple equilibria. My June 2008 article in International Studies Quarterly (“Coordination in Large Numbers,” vol. 52, no. 2) illustrates that, contrary to the expectation of collective action theory, large groups may enjoy informational advantages that allow players with incomplete information to solve difficult three-choice coordination games. I extend this analysis in my 2009 paper at the International Studies Association annual convention, in which I apply ideas from evolutionary game theory to model learning processes among players faced with coordination and commitment problems. Currently I am extending this research to include social network theory as a means of modeling explicitly the patterns of interaction in large-n (i.e. greater than two) player coordination and cooperation games. I argue in my paper at the 2009 American Political Science Association annual convention that computational social science—the synthesis of agent-based modeling, social network analysis and evolutionary game theory—empowers scholars to analyze a broad range of previously indeterminate bargaining problems. I also argue this synthesis gives researchers purchase on two of the central debates in international political economy scholarship. By modeling explicitly processes of preference formation, computational social science moves beyond the rational actor model and endogenizes the processes of learning that constructivists have identified as essential to understanding change in the international system. This focus on the micro foundations of international political economy in turn allows researchers to understand how social structural features emerge and constrain actor choices. Computational social science thus allows IPE to formalize and generalize our understandings of mutual constitution and systemic change, an observation that explains the paradoxical interest of constructivists like Ian Lustick and Matthew Hoffmann in the formal methods of computational social science. Currently I am writing a manuscript that develops these ideas and applies them to several challenges of globalization: developing institutions to manage common pool resources; reforming capital adequacy standards for banks; and understanding cascading failures in global networks.

While computational social science increasingly informs my research, I have also contributed to debates about the epistemological claims of computational social science. My chapter with James N. Rosenau in Complexity in World Politics (ed. by Neil E. Harrison, SUNY Press 2006) argues that agent-based modeling suffers from underdeveloped and hidden epistemological and ontological commitments. On a more light-hearted note, my article in PS: Political Science and Politics (“Clocks, Not Dartboards,” vol. 39, no. 3, July 2006) discusses problems with pseudo-random number generators and illustrates how they can surprise unsuspecting teachers and researchers.

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