Community

Erika Frydenlund Member since: Monday, January 26, 2015

Ph.D., International Studies, Old Dominion University, M.S., Statistics, Virginia Tech, B.S., Mathematics, University of South Carolina

Research Assistant Professor at the Virginia Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Center at Old Dominion University. I work in the Storymodelers research group at VMASC where we use computational modeling approaches to try to understand complex social issues. Our main project is currently focused on modeling the dynamics of how host communities respond to the rapid influx of forced migrants.

Ricardo Sosa Member since: Thursday, February 19, 2015

PhD, University of Sydney

Creativity, Innovation, Participation, Collaboration

Geo Kocheril Member since: Tuesday, October 01, 2019

Research fellow, PhD Candidate (University of Kassel)

Energy system transiton modelling * stakeholder and market modelling, governance and policy modelling, * agent-based modelling (ABM), optimisation, * model coupling, open and integrative modelling framework, * open source, S4F

Francesc Bellaubi Member since: Thursday, June 27, 2013

PhD candidate

performance of urban water service provision, high levels of inequities and inefficiency persist. In terms of water distribution and cost, these undesirable patterns have a high impact on peri-urban areas usually populated by marginalized and poor populations. The high levels of Non-Revenue Water (NRW), together with the existence of corrupt practices and mismanagement of water utilities, remain a highly controversial issue.

This situation confronts rent-seeking theory directly, explaining the performance-corruption relationship (Repetto, 1986). The presumption is that low performance in water supply service provision results from corruption because rent-seeking occurs. Hence, the implementation of performance-oriented reforms in the water supply sector, such as regulation or private sector participation, will reduce corruption, increasing the efficiency of water service provision. Nevertheless, latest evidence shows that “key elements of good political governance have a positive effect on the access to water services in developing countries. In turn, private sector participation has little influence other than increasing internal efficiency of water providers” (Krausse, 2009).

Indeed the relation between governance, corruption and performance seems to be more complex than theory wants to acknowledge. It must be reviewed further than a simple cause-effect relationship. It appears that poor management of water utilities, evidenced by high levels of NRW, justifies new investments. Such practices can be encouraged by an “opportunistic management”, whilst at the same time maintaining an influential “hydrocratic elite” in the sphere of water control.

The present research proposal aims to understand the relation between mismanagement and corruption of water control practices in water supply service provision. The research examines how this relationship affects the performance of water service provision and relates to water supply governance models at municipal peri-urban level in three African countries.

To understand the mismanagement-corruption relationship, we look at different case studies of water supply service provision in Senegal, Ghana and Kenya. Each case represents a different governance model in terms of management practices, institutional and organizational settings, and the actors in place, which affects the performance of water service provision in terms of allocative efficiency and access to water (equity). Whether regulation, decentralization and private sector participation constitute possible ways to reduce corruption is examined in the context of water sector reform.

In a second step, we propose a theoretical model based on Agent Based Modelling (ABM) (Pahl-Wostl, 2007) to reproduce complex social networks under a Socio-Ecological System (SES) framework approach. The model will allow us to test whether collaborative governance in the form of collective action in a participatory and negotiated decision-making process for water control, can reduce corruption and increase performance.

The present research benefits from the project “Transparency and Integrity in Service Delivery in Sub-Saharan Africa”. This project, carried out by Transparency International (TI) in 8 Sub-Saharan countries, aims to increase access to education, health and water by improving transparency and integrity in basic service delivery. The proposal retains focus on Senegal, Ghana and Kenya in the water sector.

Key words: water control, mismanagement, corruption, performance, collaborative governance, modelling, collective action, negotiation, participation

Geertje Slingerland Member since: Friday, November 20, 2020 Full Member

I am part of the Participatory Systems initiative at the Delft University of Technology. I’m currently working on my PhD project, which concerns the role of local information and stories to empower and engage citizens in their neighbourhoods. I study and use playful and creative approaches to enable the participation of children, youngsters, and adults in my research. My research interests are in research through design, citizen engagement, empowerment, and social design.

I research the role of local information and stories to increase citizen engagement in urban environments. Through workshops with citizens (children, youngsters and adults), I identify which approaches are suitable to increase engagement through local stories and storytelling. My thesis works towards a toolkit and framework which showcases possible neighbourhoud interventions, presents design guidelines, and discusses trade-offs. The research builds on workshops and projects done in The Hague and Rotterdam.

Christophe Le Page Member since: Friday, July 06, 2007 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. Biomathematics, Paris 6 University, M.Sc. Biomathematics, Paris 7 University, Engineering Degree, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences Center, AgroCampus Ouest (Rennes)

Christophe Le Page currently works at the Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD). Christophe does research on participatory modelling of the interactions between agriculture and the environment, focusing more specifically on the relationships among stakeholders about the management of natural renewable resources. Christophe is designing and using interactive agent-based simulation and role-playing games. He is an active member of the Companion Modelling research group.

Agent-based simulations and role-playing games in the field of renewable resource management.

Eric Boria Member since: Saturday, March 21, 2020 Full Member

Ph.D. Sociology, Master in Urban Planning and Policy, B.A. Biology and Sociology

Eric has graduate degrees in urban planning and policy and sociology and an undergraduate degree in biology. He has worked on multiple collaborative and interdisciplinary projects and is skilled at engaging communities and other stakeholders. He is adept at qualitative research and has earned a Certificate in Geospatial Analysis and Visualization, demonstrating proficiency in Adobe Suite, ArcGIS, agent-based modeling and system dynamics modeling. He is currently writing manuscripts for publication based on his work on motivating energy retrofit decisions, energy-related urban planning, municipal decision-making on infrastructure investments, and other work on resilience and sustainability.

Conducts urban planning and policy research on energy efficiency, environmental, and infrastructure decision making.

Moira Zellner Member since: Friday, December 06, 2013 Full Member

PhD, Urban and Regional Planning, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Moira Zellner’s academic background lies at the intersection of Urban and Regional Planning, Environmental Science, and Complexity. She has served as Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator in interdisciplinary projects examining how specific policy, technological and behavioral factors influence the emergence and impacts of a range of complex socio-ecological systems problems, where interaction effects make responsibilities, burdens, and future pathways unclear. Her research also examines how participatory complex systems modeling with stakeholders and decision-makers can support collaborative policy exploration, social learning, and system-wide transformation. Moira has taught a variety of workshops on complexity-based modeling of socio-ecological systems, for training of both scientists and decision-makers in the US and abroad. She has served the academic community spanning across the social and natural sciences, as reviewer of journals and grants and as a member of various scientific organizations. She is dedicated to serving the public through her engaged research and activism.

Applications of agent-based modeling to urban and environmental planning
Participatory modeling

Mazaher Kianpour Member since: Thursday, October 25, 2018 Full Member

B.Sc., Computer Engineering, Payame Noor University, M.Sc., Computer Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University, Ph.D., Information Security, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Mazaher Kianpour is a PhD candidate at NTNU. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering (Software) from the Payame Noor University. He obtained his Master’s degree in Architecture of Computer Systems from Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. He started his PhD in Information Security at NTNU in May 2018. His PhD research lies at the intersection of economics and information security with a socio-technical perspective. He has several years of work experience at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and his professional training includes Computer Networks, Cybersecurity and Risk Management.

My main research interest is modelling of information security, business operations and deterrents in complex ICT ecosystem. I will in particular focus on the complex interaction between various stakeholders and actors in the information security business domain. In order to model and better understand the information security ecosystem, I rely on agent-based simulation and quantitative modelling techniques such as stochastic modelling, discrete event simulations and game theory. Of particular interest is to gain increased understanding on how various security threats and measures influence business operations in the digital ecosystem.

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