Community

Simone Righi Member since: Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Ph.D. In Economics

Networks Theory, Applied Microeconomics, Industrial Organization and Social Interactions.

María Del Castillo Member since: Tuesday, February 18, 2014

PhD

Archaeological Simulation of Social Interactions, mainly between hunter gatherers societies.

Hoke Wilson Member since: Friday, April 22, 2016

PhD

Social interaction leading to the adoption better eating habits by households at all income levels

Teije Donker Member since: Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Msc Political and Social Sciences, European University Institute

My research interests fall at the intersection of Middle East area studies and political sociology. I am interested in the interaction between regime repression and contentious mobilization in (mostly Arab) authoritarian regimes.

Irendra Radjawali Member since: Monday, February 06, 2012 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D candidate at The Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Bremen, Germany, Master of Urban and Regional Planning, Institute Technology Bandung, Indonesia

My interests is always on the dynamic interactions of human and their habitat (nature/built environment, etc.). At the moment my researches focus on the political-ecology analysis of human-nature interactions and social-ecological systems analysis. I am interested in using Agent-Based Model to support my works. I have been using ABM for quite some years, although not putting too much focus on it at the moment.

Christopher Watts Member since: Monday, March 14, 2011 Full Member

PhD Warwick Business School, MSc Operational Research, University of Southampton, Post-graduate Diploma in Theology, University of Cambridge, MA / BA (Hons.) Philosophy, University of Cambridge

I live near Cambridge, and recently I developed agent-based land-use models with Geography PhD students there. I also took part in the “Cybernetics and Society” seminar.

Previously, I spent three years at Ludwig-Maximillians University, Munich, working on Human-Environment Relations and Sustainability, and over two and a half years at Surrey University, working on Innovation with Nigel Gilbert in the Centre for Research in Social Simulation (CRESS). The project at Surrey resulted in a book in 2014, “Simulating Innovation: Computer-based Tools for Rethinking Innovation”. My PhD topic, modelling human agents who energise or de-energise each other in social interactions, drew upon the work of sociologist Randall Collins. My multi-disciplinary background includes degrees in Operational Research (MSc) and Philosophy (BA/MA).

I got hooked on agent-based modelling and complexity science some time around 2000, via the work of Brian Arthur, Stuart Kauffman, Robert Axelrod and Duncan Watts (no relation!).

I am an agent-based modeller specialising in Netlogo and Excel/VBA. My recent interests include Human-Environment Relations, Innovation, Collective Intelligence and Governance Systems, and the Collapse of Complex Societies.

I have a longer term aim to study the modelling of Institutions, especially the cognitive architecture for agents who can recognise, learn and innovate in institutions.

If you’re based near Cambridge and have an idea for a modelling project, for the cost of a beer/coffee I’m always willing to offer advice.

Nicholas Magliocca Member since: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 Full Member

My broad research interests are in human-environmental interactions and land-use change. Specifically, I am interested in how people make land-use decisions, how those decisions modify the functioning of natural systems, and how those modifications feedback on human well-being, livelihoods, and subsequent land-use decisions. All of my research begins with a complex systems background with the aim of understanding the dynamics of human-environment interactions and their consequences for environmental and economic sustainability. Agent-based modeling is my primary tool of choice to understand human-environment interactions, but I also frequently use other land change modeling approaches (e.g., cellular automata, system dynamics, econometrics), spatial statistics, and GIS. I also have expertise in synthesis methods (e.g., meta-analysis) for bringing together leveraging disparate forms of social and environmental data to understand how specific cases (i.e., local) of land-use change contribute to and/or differ from broader-scale (i.e. regional or global) patterns of human-environment interactions and land change outcomes.

Daniel Formolo Member since: Friday, June 10, 2016

PhD Student

PhD student in the Agent Systems Research Group of the Department of Artificial Intelligence at the VU University Amsterdam. Current research focuses on Modeling Human Behavior and exploring Serious Games interactions with humans.

Garry Sotnik Member since: Friday, April 06, 2018 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D., Systems Science, Portland State University, M.A., Economics, Boston University, B.S., Business Administration, Boston University

With my research, I aim to improve scientific understanding of the role interactions among cognitive, behavioral, social, and demographic processes play in human adaptation to social-ecological change. Currently, I hold a Postdoctoral Research Fellow position at University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability and an Instructor position at Portland State University’s Systems Science Program. I have a Ph.D. in Systems Science (2018) from Portland State University, and an M.A. in Economics (2007) and a B.S. in Management (1999) from Boston University.

Cognitive Social Science, Social-Ecological Systems, Multi-Agent Modeling, Complex Adaptive Systems

Nathan Rollins Member since: Wednesday, August 27, 2008 Full Member Reviewer

I am a Ph.D. student studying the interactions between external regulations and social norms in natural resource management and international development. In particular, I am looking to use mixed methods research, including ethnographic research, field experiments, and agent-based computational models to explore the sustainability of market-based interventions and their possible perverse outcomes.

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