Community

Federico Bianchi Member since: Monday, April 14, 2014 Full Member

Ph.D., Economic Sociology and Labour Studies, University of Milan - University of Brescia (Italy), M.A., Sociology, University of Turin (Italy), B.A., Philosophy, University of Milan (Italy)

Social scientist based in Milan, Italy. Post-doctoral researcher in Sociology at the Department of Social and Political Sciences of the University of Milan (Italy), member of the Behave Lab. Adjunct professor of Social Network Analysis at the Graduate School in Social and Political Sciences of the University of Milan.

  • the link between economic exchange, solidarity, and inter-group conflict
  • peer-review evaluation in scientific publishing
  • integrating Agent-Based Modelling (ABM) with Social Network Analysis (SNA)

John Glass Member since: Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Ph.D., Sociology, B.A., Sociology

Interested in learning how to accurately model social power, diffusion of ideas, social exchange

Xz Yao Member since: Monday, March 17, 2014

Chuck Collver Member since: Saturday, February 24, 2018

Continuous double auction markets; call auction; alternative market structures

Tom Brughmans Member since: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

PhD in Archaeology, University of Southampton (completion 13-10-2014), MSc Archaeological Computing (Spatial Technologies), University of Southampton, MA Archaeology, University of Leuven, BA Archaeology of Syro-Palestine, University of Leuven

My research aims to explore the potential of network science for the archaeological discipline. In my review work I confront the use of network-based methods in the archaeological discipline with their use in other disciplines, especially sociology and physics. In my archaeological work I aim to develop and apply network science techniques that show particular potential for archaeology. This is done through a number of archaeological case-studies: archaeological citation networks, visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman southern Spain, and tableware distribution in the Roman Eastern Mediterranean.

Lilian Alessa Member since: Friday, May 11, 2007 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D., Cell Biology, University of British Columbia

Dr. Lilian Alessa, University of Idaho President’s Professor of Resilient Landscapes in the Landscape Architecture program, is also Co-Director of the University of Idaho Center for Resilient Communities. She conducts extensive research on human adaptation to environmental change through resilient design at landscape scales. Much of her work is funded by the National Science Foundation, including projects awarded the Arctic Observing Network, Intersections of Food, Energy and Water Systems (INFEWS) and the Dynamics of Coupled Natural Human Systems programs. Canadian-born and raised, Alessa received her degrees from the University of British Columbia. She also uses her expertise in social-ecological and technological systems science to develop ways to improve domestic resource security for community well-being, particularly through the incorporation of place-based knowledge. Her work through the Department of Homeland Security’s Center of Excellence, the Arctic Domain Awareness Center, involves developing social-technological methods to monitor and respond to critical environmental changes. Lil is a member of the National Science Foundation’s Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education and is on the Science, Technology and Education Advisory Committee for the National Ecological Observing Network (NEON). Professor Alessa also teaches a university landscape architecture capstone course: Resilient Landscapes with Professor Andrew Kliskey. Professor Alessa’s collaborative grant activity with Professor Andrew Kliskey, since coming to the university in 2013, exceeds 7 million USD to date. She has authored over a 100 publications and reports and has led the development of 2 federal climate resilience toolbox assessments, the Arctic Water Resources Vulnerability Index (AWRVI) and the Arctic Adaptation Exchange Portal (AAEP).

Elizabeth Hunter Member since: Thursday, April 09, 2020 Full Member

BA, Mathematics, BA, Economics, Msc, Mathematical Modelling

Elizabeth Hunter received a BA in Mathematics and Economics at Boston University in 2011. She worked as a health economics researcher at Research Triangle Institute for three years where she worked on a team that developed the risk adjustment models for the US health insurance exchanges. She attended the University of Limerick and received an MSc in Mathematical Modelling in 2015. She completed a PhD at Technological University Dublin. Her PhD research focuses on agent-based simulations for infectious disease epidemiology with the goal of creating an agent-based simulation of Ireland. Elizabeth is currently working on the Precise4Q as a Postdoctoral researcher working on predictive modelling in stroke.

Manolis Tzouvelekas Member since: Sunday, November 02, 2014

B.A in Public Administration, European Masters Degree in Public Administration

Social Innovation and Monetary Innovation. Developing Social Finance tools for social enterprises.

Cristina Chueca Del Cerro Member since: Friday, May 15, 2020

I’m a PhD researcher at the University of Glasgow working on modelling national identity polarisation on social media platforms using ABMs.

agent-based models, social networks, python, R, NetLogo

Shah Jamal Alam Member since: Wednesday, July 16, 2008 Full Member Reviewer

PhD in Social Simulation, Masters in Computer Science, BS in Computer Science

My current interests include: agent-based modeling, simulating social complexity, land use, dynamic networks, social and cultural anthropology, HIV transmission dynamics, socio-political conflicts and social movements

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