Community

Tony Lawson Member since: Thursday, October 06, 2011 Full Member Reviewer

Methods and Tools for the Microsimulation and Forecasting of Household Expenditure

Andrew Bell Member since: Thursday, January 23, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

PhD, Natural Resource Management, University of Michigan

Andrew Bell (Ph.D. 2010, Michigan) was a Research Fellow in the Environment and Production Technology Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, DC. His current research portfolio focuses on the use of field instruments – such as discrete choice experiments, framed field experiments, randomized control trials – to inform behavior in agent-based models of coupled human-natural systems. Prior to this post, Andrew was a post-doctoral research fellow at The Earth Institute at Columbia University, where he focused on developing applications for paleo-climate histories.

Joseph A. E. Shaheen Member since: Wednesday, April 01, 2020 Full Member

Ph.D., Computational Social Science, George Mason University, MBA, Georgetown University, BSc, Engineering:Physics, Murray State University

Joseph is an Intelligence Community Postdoc Fellow (ODNI/NCTC) co-located with the faculty of the Department of Computational and Data Sciences at George Mason University. Since his first day of university training at age 15 and having earned his undergraduate degree in Engineering:Physics at age 19, his 15 years of industry experience has been diverse, ranging from industrial engineering to people analytics.

Dr. Shaheen earned his doctorate in Computational Social Science from GMU with a dissertation on economic policy and population-scale data analysis of Internal Revenue Service records. There, he studied all U.S. firms from a biologically-grounded perspective under the guidance of Professor Rob Axtell’s research group.

Following his U.S. State Department-funded assignment with the NATO STRATCOM Centre of Excellence where he conducted large scale analysis and provided policy recommendations in the fight against ISIS/ISIL/Daesh, he has been a guest speaker on issues of Information and \textit{Social Media Warfare}–a term closely associated with his 2015 NATO report–at the Pentagon (J-39 SMA), NATO Defense Against Terrorism COE, National Defense University, OMCC and others.

A life-long scholar, Joe has received training from academic leaders in Social Network Analysis and has been recognized as an honorary Links Center Fellow in 2015 and by GMU’s Teaching Excellence award in 5 consecutive iterations.

He has appeared on CNN HLN, FOX NEWS, NBC News, Entrepreneur Magazine and has been invited to participate in the 2020 (postponed to 2021) Heidelberg Laureate Forum (Heidelberg, Germany) where he will spend time with fellow scholars of the mathematical and computer sciences as well as Fields Medal, Abel Prize, Turing Award, and Nevanlinna prize winners.

In his free time, Joe enjoys a sense of humor and practices portrait, landscape and wildlife photography. Even so - he admits, he has never been able to successfully take one decent photo of himself

Agent-based Modeling
Social Network Analysis
Network Science
Public Policy
Security Policy
Taxation Policy

David Earnest Member since: Saturday, March 13, 2010 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. in political science (2004), M.A. in security policy studies (1994)

Two themes unite my research: a commitment to methodological creativity and innovation as expressed in my work with computational social sciences, and an interest in the political economy of “globalization,” particularly its implications for the ontological claims of international relations theory.

I have demonstrated how the methods of computational social sciences can model bargaining and social choice problems for which traditional game theory has found only indeterminate and multiple equilibria. My June 2008 article in International Studies Quarterly (“Coordination in Large Numbers,” vol. 52, no. 2) illustrates that, contrary to the expectation of collective action theory, large groups may enjoy informational advantages that allow players with incomplete information to solve difficult three-choice coordination games. I extend this analysis in my 2009 paper at the International Studies Association annual convention, in which I apply ideas from evolutionary game theory to model learning processes among players faced with coordination and commitment problems. Currently I am extending this research to include social network theory as a means of modeling explicitly the patterns of interaction in large-n (i.e. greater than two) player coordination and cooperation games. I argue in my paper at the 2009 American Political Science Association annual convention that computational social science—the synthesis of agent-based modeling, social network analysis and evolutionary game theory—empowers scholars to analyze a broad range of previously indeterminate bargaining problems. I also argue this synthesis gives researchers purchase on two of the central debates in international political economy scholarship. By modeling explicitly processes of preference formation, computational social science moves beyond the rational actor model and endogenizes the processes of learning that constructivists have identified as essential to understanding change in the international system. This focus on the micro foundations of international political economy in turn allows researchers to understand how social structural features emerge and constrain actor choices. Computational social science thus allows IPE to formalize and generalize our understandings of mutual constitution and systemic change, an observation that explains the paradoxical interest of constructivists like Ian Lustick and Matthew Hoffmann in the formal methods of computational social science. Currently I am writing a manuscript that develops these ideas and applies them to several challenges of globalization: developing institutions to manage common pool resources; reforming capital adequacy standards for banks; and understanding cascading failures in global networks.

While computational social science increasingly informs my research, I have also contributed to debates about the epistemological claims of computational social science. My chapter with James N. Rosenau in Complexity in World Politics (ed. by Neil E. Harrison, SUNY Press 2006) argues that agent-based modeling suffers from underdeveloped and hidden epistemological and ontological commitments. On a more light-hearted note, my article in PS: Political Science and Politics (“Clocks, Not Dartboards,” vol. 39, no. 3, July 2006) discusses problems with pseudo-random number generators and illustrates how they can surprise unsuspecting teachers and researchers.

This website uses cookies and Google Analytics to help us track user engagement and improve our site. If you'd like to know more information about what data we collect and why, please see our data privacy policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies.