Community

C Merdes Member since: Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Bachelor of Arts (Philosophy and Computer Science), Master of Science (Computerscience)

I am a formally oriented philosopher, applying computational techniques to questions of social epistemology and political philosophy. My current research is focused on explanations and interventions for phenomena of collective irrationality.

Boyan Vassilev Member since: Friday, August 26, 2016

MA

I’m a trained philosopher, but, besides conceptual problems, I care for conclusions based on systematic observations and I also care for the applicability of those conclusions. One might say that I wish I were a behavioral economist, or maybe an ethologist/behavioral ecologist.

Lisa Benjamin Member since: Monday, June 26, 2017

BSc (major Zoology), Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, Master of Philosophy (Veterinary Public Health), PhD (Biomedical Sciences with emphasis in Epidemiology)

Antonio Díaz Member since: Wednesday, August 03, 2016

Computer Science, Philosophy

Agent Models for Social Simulation

Shelby Manney Member since: Friday, September 26, 2014

BA - English, BS - Anthropology (Archaeoinformatics - GIS, Applied Stats, Data Mang.,CRM CERT), BFA - Music, BA - Writing & Rhetoric, MA - Technical, Professional, & Science Writing (TPSW - Cert), MS - Cultural Studies in Applied Sciences (Philosophy of Science - Archaeology/Semiotics Focus), MA - Anthropology

General Question:
Without Central Control is self organization possible?

Specific Case:

Considering the seemingly preplanned, densely aggregated communities of the prehistoric Puebloan Southwest, is it possible that without centralized authority (control), that patches of low-density communities dispersed in a bounded landscape could quickly self-organize and construct preplanned, highly organized, prehistoric villages/towns?

Christopher Thron Member since: Saturday, November 07, 2015

Ph.D. in physics, University of Kentucky, Ph.D. in mathematics, University of Wisconsin

Mathematical modeling and simulation in social sciences, biology, physics, and signal processing.

Elpida Tzafestas Member since: Sunday, December 14, 2014

Electrical and Computer Engineering Degree, DEA (MSc) in Artificial Intelligence, PhD in Artificial Intelligence

Area: Complex Biological, Social and Sociotechnical Systems
Specific focus: Origins of intelligent behavior

Rocco Paolillo Member since: Monday, September 24, 2018 Full Member

BIGSSS-Departs PhD Fellow
Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences / Jacobs University (Germany)
PhD project: Residential Segregation and Intergenerational Immigrant Integration: A Schelling-Esser Model

Italian PhD fellow, fond of social complexity and agent-based modeling, applied to residential segregation and integration processes

Research Interests: Agent-based modeling, migrant integration, residential segregation

Roy Wilson Member since: Thursday, March 24, 2016

PhD Social and Comparative Analysis in Education, MS History and Policy, MH Humanities, MS Computer Science, MA Mathematics, BA Mathematics and Philosophy

I am interested in the study of small-group decision-making using agent-based simulation of models grounded in sociological social psychology. I am also interested in a particular kind of small-group decision-making: peer review.

Kimberly Rogers Member since: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 Full Member Reviewer

Environmental Engineering, PhD, Geological Sciences, Physical Geography, BSc, Music and Music Production, AASc

Dr. Kimberly G. Rogers studies the coupled human-natural processes shaping coastal environments. She obtained a B.Sc. in Geological Sciences from the University of Texas at Austin and began her graduate studies on Long Island at Stony Brook University’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. Rogers completed her Ph.D. at Vanderbilt University, where she specialized in nearshore and coastal sediment transport. She was a postdoctoral scholar and research associate at the Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research at the University of Colorado Boulder. In 2014, her foundation in the physical sciences was augmented by training in Environmental Anthropology at Indiana University Bloomington through an NSF Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability (SEES) Fellowship.

Rogers’s research is broadly interdisciplinary and examines evolving sediment dynamics at the land-sea boundary, principally within the rapidly developing river deltas of South Asia. As deltas are some of the most densely populated coastal regions on earth, she incorporates social science methods to examine how institutions — particularly those governing land use and built infrastructure — influence the flow of water and sediment in coastal areas. She integrates quantitative and qualitative approaches in her work, such as direct measurement and geochemical fingerprinting of sediment transport phenomena, agent-based modeling, institutional and geospatial analyses, and ethnographic survey techniques. Risk holder collaboration is an integral part of her research philosophy and she is committed to co-production and capacity building in her projects. Her work has gained recognition from policy influencers such as the World Bank, USAID, and the US Embassy Bangladesh and has been featured in popular media outlets such as Slate and Environmental Health Perspectives.

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