Community

Jorge Santos Member since: Saturday, July 11, 2015

Graduated in Electrical Engineering, Master in Production Enginering, Especialization in Information Systems, Especialization in Production Engineering

Computational Modeling of knowledge diffusion in organizational contexts.

Kenneth Aiello Member since: Thursday, January 23, 2020 Full Member

Ph.D., Biology and Society, Arizona State University, B.S., Sociology, Arizona State University,, B.S., Biology, Arizona State University

Kenneth D. Aiello is a postdoctoral research scholar with the Global BioSocial Complexity Initiative at ASU. Kenneth’s research contributes to cross disciplinary conversations on how historical developments in biological, social, and cultural knowledge systems are governed by processes that transform the structure, dynamics, and function of complex systems. Applying computational historical analysis and epistemology to question what scientific knowledge is and how we can analyze changes in knowledge, he uses text analysis, social network analysis, and machine learning to measure similarities and differences between the knowledge claims of individual agents and groups. His work builds on how to assess contested knowledge claims and measure the evolution of knowledge across complex systems and multiple dimensions of scale. This approach also engages in dynamic new debates about global and local structures of knowledge shaped by technological innovation within microbiology related to public policy, shrinking resources given to biomedical ideas as opposed to “translation”, and the ethics of scientific discovery. Using interdisciplinary methods for understanding historical content and context rich narratives contributes to understanding new domains and major transitions in science and provides a richer understanding of how knowledge emerges.

Alessandro Sciullo Member since: Monday, November 11, 2013

Political Science

Current main research interests are concerned on diffusion of ICT among social actors of territorial systems: citizens(individuals and households), enterprises and governmental bodies. Most used methodological tools are , so far, multivariate statistics and Social Network Analysis.
I’d like to apply an ABM approach in the context of my PhD research project, aimed to observe the different modes of collaboration among universities and enterprises and tehir different effectiveness in terms of creation and spread of new knowledge.

Dominik Reusser Member since: Thursday, January 12, 2012 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D.
  • societal transitions under climate change
  • models as learning tools
  • communication of scientific results and uncertainties to decision makers
  • efficient information processing and knowledge management in science

Adrian Groza Member since: Monday, April 29, 2013

Phd in Computer Science

Flexible agent communication
Argumentation in multi-agent systems
Knowledge representation and reasoning
Ontologies for agents
Mediation and Dispute Resolution

Bo Xu Member since: Monday, April 15, 2013

PH.D. candidate

I am major in Management Science and Engineering. My interests lie in agent-based modeling, collective intelligence, knowledge diffusion, and cooperation evolution.

leonardo.rzoya Member since: Monday, May 28, 2012

BSc in Political Science, PhD Student in Sociology

My field of interests concerns two axes:
First, epistemology of computational modeling and simulation of complex systems. I am particularly interested in a sociological inquiry about social implication of knowledge derived from complex systems’ study.
Second, assessing the possibilities and limits of studying social complexity with complex systems tools, particularly, agent-based modeling and simulation.

Cinzia Tegoni Member since: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

Water scarcity generated by climate change and mismanagement, affects individual at microlevel and the society and the system at a more general level. The research focuses on irrigation system and their robustness and adaptation capacity to uncertainty. In particular it investigates the evolution of farmers interactions and the effectiveness of policies by means of dynamic game theory and incorporate the results into an Agent Based Model to explore farmers emergent behaviors and the role of an agency in defining policies. Early knowledge of individual decision makers could help the agency to design more acceptable solutions.

Grant Snitker Member since: Monday, April 21, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

Grant Snitker, M.A., is a doctoral candidate in archaeology at Arizona State University and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. His research focuses on prehistoric uses of controlled fire, settlement history, and environmental change. Snitker approaches these topics through geoarchaeology, archaeological survey methods, GIS modeling, and landscape/fire ecology. He currently works in Spain investigating the origins and evolution of early farming communities (7,700–4,500 cal. BP) and how they used fire to create productive agricultural landscapes. Snitker also applies his knowledge of archaeology and fire ecology as an archaeological resource advisor on wildland fire incidents here in Arizona. He works alongside firefighters to protect archaeological sites from wildfires and potentially destructive firefighting activities.

Envrionmental Archaeology, Fire Ecology, GIS, Agent-based modeling, Geoarchaeology

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