Community

Shelby Manney Member since: Friday, September 26, 2014

BA - English, BS - Anthropology (Archaeoinformatics - GIS, Applied Stats, Data Mang.,CRM CERT), BFA - Music, BA - Writing & Rhetoric, MA - Technical, Professional, & Science Writing (TPSW - Cert), MS - Cultural Studies in Applied Sciences (Philosophy of Science - Archaeology/Semiotics Focus), MA - Anthropology

General Question:
Without Central Control is self organization possible?

Specific Case:

Considering the seemingly preplanned, densely aggregated communities of the prehistoric Puebloan Southwest, is it possible that without centralized authority (control), that patches of low-density communities dispersed in a bounded landscape could quickly self-organize and construct preplanned, highly organized, prehistoric villages/towns?

Claudia Binder Member since: Monday, June 09, 2014

Human-Environment relations
socio-ecological systems
Transitions
Simulation modeling

Birgit Müller Member since: Wednesday, October 26, 2011 Full Member Reviewer

PhD, Head of Junior Research Group POLISES

I am currently head of the Junior Research Group POLISES which uses agent-based models to study intended and unintended effects of global policy instruments on the social-ecological resilience of smallholders. In this project, we focus on the impact of policies targeting climate risk in two common property regimes of pastoralists in Africa (Morocco and Kenya/Ethiopia).
On a conceptual level, I work in an international team of modellers, psychologists and natural scientists on adequate representations of human behaviour in agent-based models. Furthermore, I am interested in how to describe models in an appropriate and standardised manner to increase their comprehensibility and comparison.

Nanda Wijermans Member since: Monday, October 11, 2010 Full Member Reviewer

In my research I focus on understanding human behaviour in group(s) as a part of a complex (social) system. My research can be characterised by the overall question: ‘How does group or collective behaviour arise or change given its social and physical context?‘ More specifically, I have engaged with: ‘How is (individual) human behaviour affected by being in a crowd?’, ‘Why do some groups (cooperatively) use their resources sustainably, whereas others do not?‘, ‘What is the role of (often implicit simplistic) assumptions regarding human behaviour for science and/or management?’

To address these questions, I use computational simulations to integrate and reflect synthesised knowledge from literature, empirics and experts. Models, simulation and data analysis are my tools for gaining a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying such systems. More specifically, I work with agent-based modelling (ABM), simulation experiments and data analysis of large datasets. Apart from crowd modelling and social-ecological modelling, I also develop methodological tools to analyse social simulation data and combining ABM with other methods, such as behavioural experiments.

Kenneth Aiello Member since: Thursday, January 23, 2020 Full Member

Ph.D., Biology and Society, Arizona State University, B.S., Sociology, Arizona State University,, B.S., Biology, Arizona State University

Kenneth D. Aiello is a postdoctoral research scholar with the Global BioSocial Complexity Initiative at ASU. Kenneth’s research contributes to cross disciplinary conversations on how historical developments in biological, social, and cultural knowledge systems are governed by processes that transform the structure, dynamics, and function of complex systems. Applying computational historical analysis and epistemology to question what scientific knowledge is and how we can analyze changes in knowledge, he uses text analysis, social network analysis, and machine learning to measure similarities and differences between the knowledge claims of individual agents and groups. His work builds on how to assess contested knowledge claims and measure the evolution of knowledge across complex systems and multiple dimensions of scale. This approach also engages in dynamic new debates about global and local structures of knowledge shaped by technological innovation within microbiology related to public policy, shrinking resources given to biomedical ideas as opposed to “translation”, and the ethics of scientific discovery. Using interdisciplinary methods for understanding historical content and context rich narratives contributes to understanding new domains and major transitions in science and provides a richer understanding of how knowledge emerges.

Fei Wang Member since: Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Dr.

Ecological modelling
Social Ecnomic/ecological complexity

rbandin Member since: Sunday, February 12, 2012

Master in Fisheries Science, Licensed in Biological Sciences

Modelling of socio-ecological systems and management of common property resources in artisanal fisheries. Population dynamics of coastal marine invertebrates exploited by artisanal fisheries.

Roope Oskari Kaaronen Member since: Monday, August 26, 2019 Full Member

I am a multidisciplinary researcher (PhD Candidate) at the University of Helsinki. My research interests include sustainable behaviour change, ecological psychology, cognitive science and cultural evolution. I have a soft spot for complex systems and philosophy of science.

GitHub: https://github.com/roopekaaronen/

Ecological Psychology
Environmental Policy
Philosophy of Science
Cognitive Science
Ecological Rationality
Science & Society
Complex Systems
Agent-Based Modeling

Muaz Niazi Member since: Sunday, June 07, 2009 Full Member Reviewer

BE (Hons), MS CS, PhD

Muaz is a Senior Member of the IEEE and has more than 15 years of professional, teaching and research experience. Muaz has been working on Communication Systems and Networks since 1995. His BS project in 1995 was on the development of a Cordless Local Area Network. In 1996, his postgraduate project was on Wireless Connectivity of devices to Computers. In addition to his expertise as an Communications engineer, his areas of research interest are in the development of agent-based and complex network-based models of Complex Adaptive Systems. He has worked on diverse case studies ranging from Complex Communication Networks, Biological Networks, Social Networks, Ecological system modeling, Research and Scientometric modeling and simulation etc. He has also worked on designing and developing embedded systems, distributed computing, multiagent and service-oriented architectures.

Audrey Lustig Member since: Thursday, July 18, 2013

PhD Candidate - Ecological Modelling and complex system - Lincoln University, New Zealand, Master's in computer science and modelling complex systems - ENS Lyon, France, Bioinformatics and Modeling Engineering - INSA Lyon, France

I am strongly interested in ecological modeling and complex system and truly enjoyed working with a variety of tools to uncover patterns in empirical data and explore their ecological and evolutionary consequences. My primary research is to conduct research in the field of ‘ecological complexity’, including the development of appropriate descriptive measure to quantify the structural, spatial and temporal complexity of ecosystem and the identification of the mechanism that generate this complexity, through modeling and field studies.
Currently investigated is how biological characteristics of invasive species (dispersal strategies and demographic processes) interact with abiotic variables and resource distribution to determine establishment success and spread in a complex heterogeneous environment (Individual based modelling integrated with GIS technologies).

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