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Gul Deniz Salali Member since: Sunday, November 15, 2015 Full Member

PhD in Biological Anthropology, UCL

I studied Molecular Biology and Genetics at Istanbul Technical University. During my undergraduate studies I became interested in the field of Ecology and Evolution and did internships on animal behaviour in Switzerland and Ireland. I then went on to pursue a 2-year research Master’s in Evolutionary Biology (MEME) funded by the European Union. I worked on projects using computer simulations to investigate evolution of social complexity and human cooperation. I also did behavioural economics experiments on how children learn social norms by copying others. After my Master’s, I pursued my dream of doing fieldwork and investigating human societies. I did my PhD at UCL, researching cultural evolution and behavioural adaptations in Pygmy hunter-gatherers in the Congo. During my PhD, I was part of an inter-disciplinary Hunter-Gatherer Resilience team funded by the Leverhulme Trust. I obtained a postdoctoral research fellowship from British Academy after my PhD. I am currently working as a British Academy research fellow and lecturer in Evolutionary Anthropology and Evolutionary Medicine at UCL.

  • Social learning and cultural evolution
  • Hunter-gatherers
  • Evolutionary medicine

Andrea Ceschi Member since: Monday, January 12, 2015 Full Member

Ph.D.

Senior (Tenure-Track) Assistant Professor in Work and Organizational Psychology (WOP) at the Human Sciences Department of Verona University. My expertise lies in organizational behavior, individual differences and decision-making at work, and social dynamics in the applied psychology field. In the field of fundamental research my studies explore the role of individual antecedents (e.g., Personality traits, Risk attitudes, etc.) in relation to classic I/O models (e.g., Job Demands-Resources model, Effort-Reward model, etc.). My applied research focuses on the development of interventions and policies for enhancing decision-making, and in turn well-being and job performance. Finally, in industrial research, my research aims to better integrate cognitive and behavioral theories (e.g., Theory of Planned Behavior, Prospect theory, etc.) for designing predictive models – based on agents – of social and organizational behaviors.

Enver Miguel Oruro Puma Member since: Tuesday, March 23, 2010 Full Member Reviewer

BA Psychology


http://learnmem.cshlp.org/content/27/1.cover-expansion
(Cover simulation using NetLogo, January 2020)
Enver Miguel Oruro, Grace V.E. Pardo, Aldo B. Lucion, Maria Elisa Calcagnotto and Marco A. P. Idiart. Maturation of pyramidal cells in anterior piriform cortex may be sufficient to explain the end of early olfactory learning in rats. Learn. Mem. 2020. 27: 20-32 © 2020 Oruro et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press


http://learnmem.cshlp.org/content/27/12.cover-expansion
(paper using NetLogo, December 2020)
Enver Miguel Oruro, Grace V.E. Pardo, Aldo B. Lucion, Maria Elisa Calcagnotto and Marco A. P. Idiart. The maturational characteristics of the GABA input in the anterior piriform cortex may also contribute to the rapid learning of the maternal odor during the sensitive period Learn. Mem. 2020. 27: 493-502 © 2020 Oruro et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

Enver Oruro, BA Psych. PhD(s).
Computational Psychologist
[email protected]
https://br.linkedin.com/in/enveroruro
Neurocomputational and Language Processing Laboratory, Institute of Physics/ UFRGS
Neurophysiology and Neurochemistry of Neuronal Excitability and Synaptic Plasticity Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry/ UFRGS

Meeting Organization

2009 First Meeting on Complex Systems -Neuroscience and Behavior Laboratory, School of Medicine UPCH Lima

2010 Second Meeting on Complex Systems - College of Psychologists of Peru / Colegio de Psicólogos del Perú (CPsP) Lima

2012 3rd Meeting on Complex Systems – Computational Social Psychology, /Neuroscience and Behavior Laboratory, School of Medicine UPCH Lima February 2012 https://www.comses.net/events/185/
http://www.neurocienciaperu.org/home/3ra-reunion-de-sistemas-complejos-psicologia-social-computacional
2012 4th Meeting on Complex Systems – Cognotecnology and Cognitive Science, Neuroscience and Behavior Laboratory, School of Medicine UPCH Lima July 2012 https://www.comses.net/events/212/

2014 5th Meeting on Complex Systems – Complexity Roadmap. The Imperial City of the Incas, Cusco, April. https://www.comses.net/events/312/

2015 Chair of “e-session on Neuroscience and Behavior” UNESCO UniTwin CS-DC’15
2015 Chair of “e-session on Social Psychology” UNESCO UniTwin CS-DC’15
CS-DC’15 (Complex Systems Digital Campus ’15 – World e-Conference) is organizing the e-satellites of CCS’15, the international Conference on Complex Systems. It is devoted to all scientists involved in the transdisciplinary challenges of complex systems, crossing theoretical questions with experimental observations of multi-level dynamics. CCS’15 is organized by the brand new ASU-SFI Center for Biosocial Complex Systems. Arizona State University, (USA) from Sept 28 to Oct 2, 2015, in close collaboration with the Complex Systems Society and the Santa Fe Institute. from http://cs-dc-15.org/

2018 Seminar in “Mother-Infant Attachment and Supercomputing”, NY. USA and Porto Alegre, Brazil, August 09. https://www.comses.net/events/499/

2019 Seminar in Experimental and Computational Studies on Mother-Infant Relationship October 8 and 15, 2019 ICBS, /Determine the neural pathways by which the nervous system of the neonates establish attachment with their mothers is a problem that has motivated hypothesis and experiments at several scale levels, from neurotransmission to ethological level. UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil. https://www.comses.net/events/549/

2020 Seminar in Maternal Infant Relationship Studies: Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence March 7 and 9
Goals 1. Discuss a Roadmap for mother-Infant relationship research in the framework of the UNESCO Complex System Digital Campus project. https://www.comses.net/events/570/ https://sites.google.com/view/envermiguel/seminar-in-maternal-infant-relationship-studies?read_current=1

Linea de investigacion: Estrategias de modelamiento en Psicobiologia y Psicologia Social
/ Linea estrategica 1: bases biologicas de la cognicion social desde sistemas complejos

Shelby Manney Member since: Friday, September 26, 2014

BA - English, BS - Anthropology (Archaeoinformatics - GIS, Applied Stats, Data Mang.,CRM CERT), BFA - Music, BA - Writing & Rhetoric, MA - Technical, Professional, & Science Writing (TPSW - Cert), MS - Cultural Studies in Applied Sciences (Philosophy of Science - Archaeology/Semiotics Focus), MA - Anthropology

General Question:
Without Central Control is self organization possible?

Specific Case:

Considering the seemingly preplanned, densely aggregated communities of the prehistoric Puebloan Southwest, is it possible that without centralized authority (control), that patches of low-density communities dispersed in a bounded landscape could quickly self-organize and construct preplanned, highly organized, prehistoric villages/towns?

Flaminio Squazzoni Member since: Sunday, November 07, 2010 Full Member

PhD. Assistant Professor of Economic Sociology

Flaminio Squazzoni is Full Professor of Sociology at the Department of Social and Political Sciences of the University of Milan and director of BEHAVE. He teaches “Sociology” to undergraduate students, “Behavioural Sociology” to master students and “Behavioural Game Theory” to PhD students. Untill November 2018, he has been Associate Professor of Economic Sociology at the Department of Economics and Management of the University of Brescia, where he led the GECS-Research Group on Experimental and Computational Sociology.

He is editor of JASSS-Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, co-editor of Sociologica -International Journal for Sociological Debate and member of the editorial boards of Research Integrity and Peer Review and Sistemi Intelligenti. He is advisory editor of the Wiley Series in Computational and Quantitative Social Science and the Springer Series in Computational Social Science and member of the advisory board of ING’s ThinkForward Initiative. He is former President of the European Social Simulation Association (Sept 2012/Sept 2016, since 2010 member of the Management Committee) and former Director of the NASP ESLS PhD Programme in Economic Sociology and Labour Studies (2015-2016).

His fields of research are behavioural sociology, economic sociology and sociology of science, with a particular interest on the effect of social norms and institutions on cooperation in decentralised, large-scale social systems. His research has a methodological focus, which lies in the intersection of experimental (lab) and computational (agent-based modelling) research.

Paul Van Liedekerke Member since: Thursday, May 31, 2018

Interested in numerical models and new conceptual ideas, applications from industry to medicine.

I focus on numerical modeling of mechanics of solid materials and cell mechanics. The models that I developed so far address granular matters, bio-fluids, cellular tissues, and individual cells.

I further develop Agent-based Models, which are methods to predict collective behavior from individual dynamics controlled by rules or differential equations. Examples: tumor growth, swarms, crowd movement.

The methods I used are Particle-based methods which offer great flexibility within physical modeling, and can operate in a large range of scales, from atomistic scales (e.g. Molecular Dynamics) to continuum approaches (e.g. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics).

Fabian Adelt Member since: Monday, November 20, 2017

Computer Studies, Diploma-Degree

Fabian Adelt graduated in computer-sciences with a minor in sociology of technology (degree: Diplom-Informatiker) at TU Dortmund University in 2011. Currently, he is research fellow at the Technology Studies Group and involved in the project “Collaborative Data- and Risk-Management in Future Grids – A Simulation Study” (KoRiSim). Between 2012 and 2015 he worked on the project “Mixed Modes of Governance as a Means of Risk Management in Complex Systems” (RiskSim). His research interests entail agent-based modelling and simulating of socio-technical systems, especially focussing on governance issues and actors’ reactions on interventions. Experience covers the fields of mobility and energy.

Muaz Niazi Member since: Sunday, June 07, 2009 Full Member Reviewer

BE (Hons), MS CS, PhD

Muaz is a Senior Member of the IEEE and has more than 15 years of professional, teaching and research experience. Muaz has been working on Communication Systems and Networks since 1995. His BS project in 1995 was on the development of a Cordless Local Area Network. In 1996, his postgraduate project was on Wireless Connectivity of devices to Computers. In addition to his expertise as an Communications engineer, his areas of research interest are in the development of agent-based and complex network-based models of Complex Adaptive Systems. He has worked on diverse case studies ranging from Complex Communication Networks, Biological Networks, Social Networks, Ecological system modeling, Research and Scientometric modeling and simulation etc. He has also worked on designing and developing embedded systems, distributed computing, multiagent and service-oriented architectures.

Tom Brughmans Member since: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

PhD in Archaeology, University of Southampton (completion 13-10-2014), MSc Archaeological Computing (Spatial Technologies), University of Southampton, MA Archaeology, University of Leuven, BA Archaeology of Syro-Palestine, University of Leuven

My research aims to explore the potential of network science for the archaeological discipline. In my review work I confront the use of network-based methods in the archaeological discipline with their use in other disciplines, especially sociology and physics. In my archaeological work I aim to develop and apply network science techniques that show particular potential for archaeology. This is done through a number of archaeological case-studies: archaeological citation networks, visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman southern Spain, and tableware distribution in the Roman Eastern Mediterranean.

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