Community

n.malleson Member since: Thursday, January 05, 2012

PhD - Geography, MsC - Informatics

My primary research interest is in developing spatial computer models of social phenomena and my focus, in particular, has been on crime simulation.

Gert Hofstede Member since: Wednesday, March 05, 2014

PhD

My research focuses on using generic social science in creating models of social reality, in particular self-organization of social systems.

Tom Brughmans Member since: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

PhD in Archaeology, University of Southampton (completion 13-10-2014), MSc Archaeological Computing (Spatial Technologies), University of Southampton, MA Archaeology, University of Leuven, BA Archaeology of Syro-Palestine, University of Leuven

My research aims to explore the potential of network science for the archaeological discipline. In my review work I confront the use of network-based methods in the archaeological discipline with their use in other disciplines, especially sociology and physics. In my archaeological work I aim to develop and apply network science techniques that show particular potential for archaeology. This is done through a number of archaeological case-studies: archaeological citation networks, visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman southern Spain, and tableware distribution in the Roman Eastern Mediterranean.

Lubna Ansari Member since: Friday, March 25, 2016

M.Tech, B.Tech

Critical simulation of social simulation techniques

Angelos Chliaoutakis Member since: Thursday, March 26, 2020

Ph.D., Computer Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Greece

Angelos Chliaoutakis received his PhD in Electronic & Computer Engineering in 2020 at Technical University of Crete (TUC), Greece. During 2005-2020 he was a research assistant at the Intelligent Systems Laboratory of TUC, participating in several research projects associated with NLP, semantic similarity and ontology based information systems. Since 2010 he is also a research assistant at the Laboratory of Geophysical - Satellite Remote Sensing and Archaeo-environment (GeoSat ReSeArch Lab) of the Institute for Mediterranean Studies of Foundation for Research and Technology (IMS-FORTH), were he is involved in various research projects related to the full-stack development of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), web-based GIS applications and Geoinformatics in the cultural and archaeological domain. This ultimately transformed his interest and research direction towards computational archaeology, in particular, agent-based modeling and simulation, while intertwining ideas and approaches from Artificial Intelligence, Multi-agent Systems and GIS.

Research activities range between Computer Science, Information Systems and Natural Language Processing (NLP), Agent-based modeling/simulation (ABM), Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) and Geographical Information Science (GIScience).

Bruce Edmonds Member since: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 Full Member Reviewer

BA(Hons) Mathematics, Oxford, 1983, PhD in Philosophy of Science, Manchester 1999

I studied Mathematics at Oxford (1979-1983) then did youth work in inner city areas for the Educational Charity. After teaching in Grenada in the West Indies we came back to the UK, where the first job I could get was in a 6th form college (ages 16-18). They sent me to do post16 PCGE, which was so boring that I also started a part-time PhD. The PhD was started in 1992 and was on the meaning and definition of the idea of “complexity”, which I had been pondering for a few years. Given the growth of the field of complexity from that time, I had great fun reading almost anything in the library but I did finally finish it in 1999. Fortunately I got a job at the Centre for Policy Modelling (CfPM) in 1994 with its founder and direction, Scott Moss. We were doing agent-based social simulation then, but did not know it was called this and did not meet other such simulators for a few years. With Scott Moss we built the CfPM into one of the leading research centres in agent-based social simulation in the world. I became director of the CfPM just before Scott retired, and later became Professor of Social Simulation in 2013. For more about me see http://bruce.edmonds.name or http://cfpm.org.

All aspects of social simulation including: techniques, tools, applications, philosophy, methodology and interesting examples. Understanding complex social systems. Context-dependency and how it affects interaction and cognition. Complexity and how this impacts upon simulation modelling. Social aspects of cognition - or to put it another way - the social embedding of intelligence. Simulating how science works. Integrating qualitative evidence better into ABMs. And everything else.

Eric Silverman Member since: Thursday, December 20, 2012 Full Member

PhD, Computer Science, University of Leeds, BA, Psychology, Pennsylvania State University (Schreyer Honors College)

Eric is a Research Fellow in the Complexity programme at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Unit at the University of Glasgow, working on agent-based simulation approaches to complex public health issues. Prior to this he was a Research Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Systems in the School of Computing at Teesside University. Before working at Teesside, he worked on the CLC Project at the University of Southampton, a multidisciplinary project which focuses on the application of complexity science approaches to the social science domain.

Eric received a BA with Honours in Psychology from Pennsylvania State University, and a PhD from the School of Computing at the University of Leeds. After his PhD, he worked as a JSPS Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Tokyo, conducting research in computer simulation and robotics.

  • Agent-based modelling for population health
  • Modelling informal and formal social care
  • Model documentation and dissemination

Corinna Elsenbroich Member since: Wednesday, January 18, 2017

PhD Computer Science

Corinna is a lecturer in the Department of Sociology. She joined the Centre for Research in Social Simulation at the in August 2008 as a Research Fellow. Her academic background is in Philosophy (LSE, BSc MSc) and Computer Science (KCL,PhD), where her PhD Instinct for Detection developed a logic for abductive reasoning.

Currently Corinna is the PI on an AHRC Research Grant on collective reasoning in agent-based modelling, titled Collective Reasoning as a Moral Point of View. Her research interests are decision mechanisms, in particular collective decision-making, context dependency of decisions and methodological and epistemological aspects of agent-based modelling and social simulation. She has applied collective decision making to the analysis to the weakening of the Mafia in Southern Italy within the GLODERS project and published a book Modelling Norms, co-authored with Nigel Gilbert, providing a systematic analysis of the contribution of agent-based modelling to the study of social norms and deviant behaviour. Recently Corinna has been developing a teaching stream within CRESS with a periodically running short course Agent-based Modelling for the Social Scientist and the MSc Social Science and Complexity.

Luis Gustavo Nardin Member since: Thursday, August 04, 2011

  • Modeling and Simulation (Agent-Based & Discrete-Event)
  • Simulation Analytics
  • Computational Social Sciences

Davide Secchi Member since: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

PhD in Business Administration

I am currently Associate Professor of Organizational Cognition and Director of the Research Centre for Computational & Organisational Cognition at the Department of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, Slagelse. My current research efforts are on socially-based decision making, agent-based modeling, cognitive processes in organizations and corporate social responsibility. He is author of more than 50 articles and book chapters, the monograph Extendable Rationality (2011), and he recently edited Agent-Based Simulation of Organizational Behavior with M. Neumann (2016).

My simulation research focuses on the applications of ABM to organizational behavior studies. I study socially-distributed decision making—i.e., the process of exploiting external resources in a social environment—and I work to develop its theoretical underpinnings in order to to test it. A second stream of research is on how group dynamics affect individual perceptions of social responsibility and on the definition and measurement of individual social responsibility (I-SR).

This website uses cookies and Google Analytics to help us track user engagement and improve our site. If you'd like to know more information about what data we collect and why, please see our data privacy policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies.