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Juan Ocampo Member since: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 Full Member

PhD Candidate at Lund School of Economics and Management - Sweden, (2019) MSocSc Organizational Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Copenhagen Business School, (2016) MSc in Industrial Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, (2012) Industrial Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

I am Colombian with passion for social impact. I believe that change starts at the individual, community, local and then global level. I have set my goal in making a better experience to whatever challenges I encounter and monetary systems and governance models is what concerns me at the time.

In my path to understanding and reflecting about these issues I have found my way through “Reflexive Modeling”. Models are just limited abstractions of reality and is part of our job as researchers to dig in the stories behind our models and learn to engage in a dialogue between both worlds.

Technology empowers us to act locally, autonomously and in decentralized ways and my research objective is to, in a global context, find ways to govern, communicate and scale the impact of alternative monetary models. This with a special focus on achieving a more inclusive and community owned financial system.

As a Ph.D. fellow for the Agenda 2030 Graduate School, I expect to identify challenges and conflicting elements in the sustainability agenda, contribute with new perspectives, and create solutions for the challenges ahead

Christopher Watts Member since: Monday, March 14, 2011 Full Member

PhD Warwick Business School, MSc Operational Research, University of Southampton, Post-graduate Diploma in Theology, University of Cambridge, MA / BA (Hons.) Philosophy, University of Cambridge

I live near Cambridge, and recently I developed agent-based land-use models with Geography PhD students there. I also took part in the “Cybernetics and Society” seminar.

Previously, I spent three years at Ludwig-Maximillians University, Munich, working on Human-Environment Relations and Sustainability, and over two and a half years at Surrey University, working on Innovation with Nigel Gilbert in the Centre for Research in Social Simulation (CRESS). The project at Surrey resulted in a book in 2014, “Simulating Innovation: Computer-based Tools for Rethinking Innovation”. My PhD topic, modelling human agents who energise or de-energise each other in social interactions, drew upon the work of sociologist Randall Collins. My multi-disciplinary background includes degrees in Operational Research (MSc) and Philosophy (BA/MA).

I got hooked on agent-based modelling and complexity science some time around 2000, via the work of Brian Arthur, Stuart Kauffman, Robert Axelrod and Duncan Watts (no relation!).

I am an agent-based modeller specialising in Netlogo and Excel/VBA. My recent interests include Human-Environment Relations, Innovation, Collective Intelligence and Governance Systems, and the Collapse of Complex Societies.

I have a longer term aim to study the modelling of Institutions, especially the cognitive architecture for agents who can recognise, learn and innovate in institutions.

If you’re based near Cambridge and have an idea for a modelling project, for the cost of a beer/coffee I’m always willing to offer advice.

leonardo.rzoya Member since: Monday, May 28, 2012

BSc in Political Science, PhD Student in Sociology

My field of interests concerns two axes:
First, epistemology of computational modeling and simulation of complex systems. I am particularly interested in a sociological inquiry about social implication of knowledge derived from complex systems’ study.
Second, assessing the possibilities and limits of studying social complexity with complex systems tools, particularly, agent-based modeling and simulation.

Sae Schatz Member since: Tuesday, November 04, 2014

Modeling and Simulation, Ph.D., Modeling and Simulation, M.S., Computer Information Technology, B.S.

Sae Schatz, Ph.D., is an applied human–systems researcher, professional facilitator, and cognitive scientist. Her work focuses on human–systems integration (HSI), with an emphasis on human cognition and learning, instructional technologies, adaptive systems, human performance assessment, and modeling and simulation (M&S). Frequently, her work seeks to enhance individual’s higher-order cognitive skills (i.e., the mental, emotional, and relational skills associated with “cognitive readiness”).

Brent Auble Member since: Friday, December 17, 2010

B.S. Computer Science, Lafayette College, MAIS, Computational Social Science, George Mason University

Dissertation: Narrative Generation for Agent-Based Models

Abstract: This dissertation proposes a four-level framework for thinking about having agent-based models (ABM) generate narrative describing their behavior, and then provides examples of models that generate narrative at each of those levels. In addition, “interesting” agents are identified in order to direct the attention of researchers to the narratives most likely to be worth spending their time reviewing. The focus is on developing techniques for generating narrative based on agent actions and behavior, on techniques for generating narrative describing aggregate model behavior, and on techniques for identifying “interesting” agents. Examples of each of these techniques are provided in two different ABMs, Zero-Intelligence Traders (Gode & Sunder, 1993, 1997) and Sugarscape (Epstein & Axtell, 1996).

Ismael Chaile Member since: Wednesday, December 11, 2013 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. with research line in Multi-agent systems and Distributed systems (robots, IoT), Master In Science in Micro and Nanoelectronic, Master in General Direcction and Strategic Planning, Electronic Engineer

I have been researching in synchronization between agent-based-models (ABM) and multi robot systems used in logistic and manufacturing. I use Netlogo as ABM.
I develop and agile methodology to use the same ABM as supervisory control and data aquisition (SCADA). The framework works fine and I test it in two SCADAs, which you can see in my youtube channel (http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJIb_UL-ak98F5OZxOHL0FQ).

Andrea Ceschi Member since: Monday, January 12, 2015 Full Member

Ph.D.

Senior (Tenure-Track) Assistant Professor in Work and Organizational Psychology (WOP) at the Human Sciences Department of Verona University. My expertise lies in organizational behavior, individual differences and decision-making at work, and social dynamics in the applied psychology field. In the field of fundamental research my studies explore the role of individual antecedents (e.g., Personality traits, Risk attitudes, etc.) in relation to classic I/O models (e.g., Job Demands-Resources model, Effort-Reward model, etc.). My applied research focuses on the development of interventions and policies for enhancing decision-making, and in turn well-being and job performance. Finally, in industrial research, my research aims to better integrate cognitive and behavioral theories (e.g., Theory of Planned Behavior, Prospect theory, etc.) for designing predictive models – based on agents – of social and organizational behaviors.

Jessica Turnley Member since: Monday, July 13, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

B.A. Anthropology/English Lit, Univ of California, Santa Cruz, 1974, M.A. Social Anthropology, Univ of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1977, M.A. Cultural Anthropology, Cornell University, 1978, Ph.D. Anthropology/SE Asian Studies, Cornell University, 1983

I am interested in questions of method, and in the application of computational social models to a wide variety of national security questions (such as counterterrorism and counterinsurgency) as well as decision-making around complex natural resources such as water. My methods interest center on the use of qualitative social theory to inform the structure of computational social models, and the ways in which such models handle qualitative data. This raises questions around the nature of data and the ways in which computational social models convey information to decision-makers.

Néill Sweeney Member since: Monday, June 22, 2015

Ph.D.

For my Ph.D. thesis, I developed a system to play poker.
I’m interested to see whether a similar approach can be applied to agent based models.

Corinna Elsenbroich Member since: Wednesday, January 18, 2017

PhD Computer Science

Corinna is a lecturer in the Department of Sociology. She joined the Centre for Research in Social Simulation at the in August 2008 as a Research Fellow. Her academic background is in Philosophy (LSE, BSc MSc) and Computer Science (KCL,PhD), where her PhD Instinct for Detection developed a logic for abductive reasoning.

Currently Corinna is the PI on an AHRC Research Grant on collective reasoning in agent-based modelling, titled Collective Reasoning as a Moral Point of View. Her research interests are decision mechanisms, in particular collective decision-making, context dependency of decisions and methodological and epistemological aspects of agent-based modelling and social simulation. She has applied collective decision making to the analysis to the weakening of the Mafia in Southern Italy within the GLODERS project and published a book Modelling Norms, co-authored with Nigel Gilbert, providing a systematic analysis of the contribution of agent-based modelling to the study of social norms and deviant behaviour. Recently Corinna has been developing a teaching stream within CRESS with a periodically running short course Agent-based Modelling for the Social Scientist and the MSc Social Science and Complexity.

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