Community

Audrey Lustig Member since: Thursday, July 18, 2013

PhD Candidate - Ecological Modelling and complex system - Lincoln University, New Zealand, Master's in computer science and modelling complex systems - ENS Lyon, France, Bioinformatics and Modeling Engineering - INSA Lyon, France

I am strongly interested in ecological modeling and complex system and truly enjoyed working with a variety of tools to uncover patterns in empirical data and explore their ecological and evolutionary consequences. My primary research is to conduct research in the field of ‘ecological complexity’, including the development of appropriate descriptive measure to quantify the structural, spatial and temporal complexity of ecosystem and the identification of the mechanism that generate this complexity, through modeling and field studies.
Currently investigated is how biological characteristics of invasive species (dispersal strategies and demographic processes) interact with abiotic variables and resource distribution to determine establishment success and spread in a complex heterogeneous environment (Individual based modelling integrated with GIS technologies).

Valentas Gruzauskas Member since: Saturday, October 07, 2017

PhDc

The main research area is operation research in logistics with a focus on logistic cluster development and innovative technology usage. Due to mathematical background, Gružauskas focuses on quantitative analysis by conducting simulations, stochastic and dynamic models and other analytical approaches to amplify the developed theories. Gružauskas also is working as a freelance data analyst with a focus on statistical analysis, web scraping and machine learning.

Miguel Pais Member since: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

PhD in Marine Biology, MSc in Ecology and Environmental Management

My research focuses on applied marine ecology and environmental management, particularly with coastal fish assemblages. Research interests include fish ecology, environmental monitoring and assessment methodology and individual-based models.

Juan Moisés De la Serna Member since: Sunday, January 10, 2021

publons.com/researcher/2900535/juan-moises-de-la-serna | orcid.org/0000-0002-8401-8018 |PhD in Psychology US.es and Master in Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology UPO.es |Part Time Online Adjunct Faculty UNIR.net |The most read author in Spain in 2020|Expert in Quality Agency for Higher Education of Latvia AIKA.LV |Nowadays, my research focuses on Potential Factors Influencing COVID-19 and Short- & Long-Term Psychological and Neurological complications after SARS-CoV-2 infection in humans

Social change with COVID-19

Antônio Ralph Medeiros-Sousa Member since: Thursday, September 19, 2019 Full Member

Antônio Sousa is a biologist with a background in medical entomology, disease ecology, statistical and computational modeling. Antônio has a Ph.D. (2018) and Master (2014) in Science from the School of Public Health at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Currently, he is a postdoctoral fellow in the same institution.

My research interest lies in the study of the transmission and dispersal dynamics of vector-borne diseases. I have been working on the development of statistical, mathematical and computational models to understand bioecology of mosquitoes and to predict the transmission dynamics of pathogens transmitted by these insects.

Kenneth Aiello Member since: Thursday, January 23, 2020 Full Member

Ph.D., Biology and Society, Arizona State University, B.S., Sociology, Arizona State University,, B.S., Biology, Arizona State University

Kenneth D. Aiello is a postdoctoral research scholar with the Global BioSocial Complexity Initiative at ASU. Kenneth’s research contributes to cross disciplinary conversations on how historical developments in biological, social, and cultural knowledge systems are governed by processes that transform the structure, dynamics, and function of complex systems. Applying computational historical analysis and epistemology to question what scientific knowledge is and how we can analyze changes in knowledge, he uses text analysis, social network analysis, and machine learning to measure similarities and differences between the knowledge claims of individual agents and groups. His work builds on how to assess contested knowledge claims and measure the evolution of knowledge across complex systems and multiple dimensions of scale. This approach also engages in dynamic new debates about global and local structures of knowledge shaped by technological innovation within microbiology related to public policy, shrinking resources given to biomedical ideas as opposed to “translation”, and the ethics of scientific discovery. Using interdisciplinary methods for understanding historical content and context rich narratives contributes to understanding new domains and major transitions in science and provides a richer understanding of how knowledge emerges.

Marta Czarnocka-Cieciura Member since: Wednesday, January 08, 2020

I graduated Bachelor and Master studies at the University of Warsaw, obtaining the diploma in biology at College of Inter-Faculty Individual Studies in Mathematics and Natural Sciences (MISMaP). After graduation I worked as a freelancer in data science and statistics, then worked for 2 years as a data scientist in an IT startup and now I am working as a statistician in The Polish National Information Processing Institute (OPI PIB) in a group analysing condition of science and higher education in Poland. My interests: agent based modelling, evolutionary ecology, statistics, data science, sociology of science.

Giorgio Gosti Member since: Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Magistral Degree, Physics, University of Rome, “La Sapienza”, Italy, Dottorato, Computer Science and Mathemaatics, University of Perugia, Italy, PhD, Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences, Social Science, University of California, Irvine

My research focuses pn the intersection between game theory, social networks, and multi-agent simulations. The objectives of this scientific endeavor are to inform policy makers, generate new technological applications, and bring new insight into human and non-human social behavior. My research focus is on the transformation of cultural conventions, such as signaling and lexical forms, and on many cell models models of stem cell derived clonal colony.

Because the models I analyze are formally defined using game theory and network theory, I am able to approach them with different methods that range from stochastic process analysis to multi-agent simulations.

Ken Buetow Member since: Thursday, November 15, 2018 Full Member

PhD, Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, MS, Human Genetics, University of Pitttsburgh, BA, Biology, Indiana University

Ken Buetow is a human genetics and genomics researcher who leverages computational tools to understand complex traits such as cancer, liver disease, and obesity. He currently serves as director of Computational Sciences and Informatics program for Complex Adaptive Systems at Arizona State University ([email protected]), is a professor in the School of Life Sciences in ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; is a core faculty in the Center for Evolution and Medicine in the Biodesign Institute at ASU; and is director of bioinformatics and data management for the National Biomarker Development Alliance.

Professor Buetow previously served as the Founding Director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology within the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute.

Kit Martin Member since: Thursday, January 15, 2015 Full Member

B.A. History, Bard College, M.A. International Development Practice Humphrey School of Public Affairs, PhD. Northwestern, Learning Sciences

I have a strong background in building and incorporating agent-based simulations for learning. Throughout my graduate career, I have worked at the Center for Connected Learning and Computer Based Modeling (CCL), developing modeling and simulation tools for learning. In particular, we develop NetLogo, the gold standard agent-based modeling environment for learners around the world. In my dissertation work, I marry biology and computer science to teach the emergent principles of ant colonies foraging for food and expanding. The work builds on more than a decade of experience in ABM. I now work at the Center for the Science and the Schools as an Assistant Professor. We delivered a curriculum to teach about COVID-19, where I incorporated ABMs into the curriculum.

You can keep up with my work at my webpage: https://kitcmartin.com

Studying the negative externalities of networks, and the ways in which those negatives feedback and support the continuities.

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