Community

Etienne DELAY Member since: Thursday, October 04, 2018 Full Member

Ph.D., Geography, Limoges univerity

To tackle the scientific challenges proposed by landscape dynamics and cooperation processes, I have developed a research methodology based on field work and companion modelling (ComMod) combined with the formalisation of the observed processes and agents based models.
This approach offers the possibility to understand : spatial, social, cultural and / or economic conditions that take place on territories, and to provide prospective scenarios.
These methods have been applied in various contexts: steep slope vineyards landscapes (2011), water resource management cooperation (2015), vegetation cover in dry climate (2017). The established research networks are still active through sustained collaborations and activities.

My technical expertise grew and evolved through investment in several workgroups: MAPS Team (Modelling Applied to Space Phenomena), OSGeo (president of the OSGeo’s French chapter between 2013 and 2016, member of the OSGeo-international chapter since 2015), various initiatives around modelling, exploration and sensibility analysis of spatial patterns behaviours, and more generally in Free Software communities.

I am interested in the socio-environmental conditions for the emergence of cooperation and mutual aid in social systems and mainly with regard to renewable resources. I consider in this context that Commons are a spatial manifestation of mutual aid.
From a technical point of view, I am very interested in the questions of model exploration (HPC), which led me to integrate the OpenMole community and to contribute to discussions about heuristic exploration.

Dehua Gao Member since: Monday, January 05, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

PROFESSIONS

Associate Professor
School of Management Science and Engineering, Shandong Technology and Business University (Yantai 264005, P. R. China)

EDUCATION BACKGROUDS

Ph. D. Degree, 09/2009 – 07/2015
School of Economics and Management, Beihang University (P. R. China)

M. A. Degree, 09/2003 – 02/2006
The Institute of Systems Engineering, Dalian University of Technology (P. R. China)

B. A. Degree, 09/1999 – 07/2003
Department of Information and Control Engineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry (P. R. China)

VISITING & SUMMER SCHOOLS

Visiting Scholar at GECS – Research Group of Experimental and Computational Sociology (March, 2017 – February, 2018)
 Università degli Studi di Brescia (Italy)
 Co-supervisor: Professor Flaminio Squazzoni

Summer school in ‘Agent-based modeling for social scientists’ (September 4-8, 2017)
 University of Brescia, Italy
 Instructors: Flaminio Squazzoni, Simone Gabbriellini, Nicolas Payette, Federico Bianchi

The Santa Fe Institute’s Massive Open Online Course: Introduction to Agent-Based Modeling (Jun 5 – September 8, 2017)
 The Santa Fe Institute, Complexity Explore Web: abm.complexityexploer.org
 Instructors: Bill Rand

Summer school in ‘Complex systems and management’ (July 2-12, 2012)
 National Defense University, P. R. China
 Instructors: Xinjun Mao, Yongfang Liu, Dinghua Shi, Qiyue Cheng

Routine dynamics, Agent-based modeling, Computational social/organization science, Industrial systems engineering, etc.

Klaus G. Troitzsch Member since: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 Full Member

Klaus G. Troitzsch was a full professor of computer applications in the social sciences at the University of Koblenz-Landau since 1986 until he officially retired in 2012 (but continues his academic activities). He took his first degree as a political scientist. After eight years in active politics in Hamburg and after having taken his PhD, he returned to academia, first as a senior researcher in an election research project at the University of Koblenz-Landau, from 1986 as full professor of computer applications in the social sciences. His main interests in teaching and research are social science methodology and, especially, modelling and simulation in the social sciences.
Among his early research projects there is the MIMOSE project which developed a declarative functional simulation language and tool for micro and multilevel simulation between 1986 and 1992. Several EU funded projects were devoted to social simulation and policy modelling, the most recent from 2012 to 2015 combining data/text mining and agent-based simulation to analyse the global dynamics of extortion racket systems.
He authored, co-authored, and co-edited several books and many articles in social simulation, and he organised or co-organised a number of national and international conferences in this field. Over nearly three decades he advised and/or supervised more than 55 PhD theses, most of them in the field of social simulation. He offered annual summer and spring courses in social simulation between 1997 and 2009; more recent courses of this kind are now being organised by the European Social Simulation Assiciation and held at different places all over Europe (mostly with his contributions).

Computational social science, structuralist theory reconstruction

Andrew Gillreath-Brown Member since: Thursday, July 25, 2019 Full Member

A.S., Pre-Engineering, Wallace State Community College, B.S., Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Freed-Hardeman University, B.A., Religious Studies, Freed-Hardeman University, B.A., Anthropology, Middle Tennessee State University, M.S., Applied Geography: Environmental Archaeology, University of North Texas

I am a computational archaeologist interested in how individuals and groups respond to both large scale processes such as climate change and local processes such as violence and wealth inequality. I am currently a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Washington State University.

My dissertation research focuses on experimenting with paleoecological data (e.g., pollen) to assess whether or not different approaches are feasible for paleoclimatic field reconstructions. In addition, I will also use pollen data to generate vegetation (biome) reconstructions. By using tree-ring and pollen data, we can gain a better understanding of the paleoclimate and the spatial distribution of vegetation communities and how those changed over time. These data can be used to better understand changes in demography and how people responded to environmental change.

In Summer 2019, I attended the Santa Fe Institute‘s Complex Systems Summer School, where I got to work in a highly collaborative and interdisciplinary international scientific community. For one of my projects, I got to merry my love of Sci-fi with complexity and agent-based modeling. Sci-fi agent-based modeling is an anthology and we wanted to build a community of collaborators for exploring sci-fi worlds. We also have an Instagram page (@Scifiabm).

Gul Deniz Salali Member since: Sunday, November 15, 2015 Full Member

PhD in Biological Anthropology, UCL

I studied Molecular Biology and Genetics at Istanbul Technical University. During my undergraduate studies I became interested in the field of Ecology and Evolution and did internships on animal behaviour in Switzerland and Ireland. I then went on to pursue a 2-year research Master’s in Evolutionary Biology (MEME) funded by the European Union. I worked on projects using computer simulations to investigate evolution of social complexity and human cooperation. I also did behavioural economics experiments on how children learn social norms by copying others. After my Master’s, I pursued my dream of doing fieldwork and investigating human societies. I did my PhD at UCL, researching cultural evolution and behavioural adaptations in Pygmy hunter-gatherers in the Congo. During my PhD, I was part of an inter-disciplinary Hunter-Gatherer Resilience team funded by the Leverhulme Trust. I obtained a postdoctoral research fellowship from British Academy after my PhD. I am currently working as a British Academy research fellow and lecturer in Evolutionary Anthropology and Evolutionary Medicine at UCL.

  • Social learning and cultural evolution
  • Hunter-gatherers
  • Evolutionary medicine

Juan Ocampo Member since: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 Full Member

PhD Candidate at Lund School of Economics and Management - Sweden, (2019) MSocSc Organizational Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Copenhagen Business School, (2016) MSc in Industrial Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, (2012) Industrial Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

I am Colombian with passion for social impact. I believe that change starts at the individual, community, local and then global level. I have set my goal in making a better experience to whatever challenges I encounter and monetary systems and governance models is what concerns me at the time.

In my path to understanding and reflecting about these issues I have found my way through “Reflexive Modeling”. Models are just limited abstractions of reality and is part of our job as researchers to dig in the stories behind our models and learn to engage in a dialogue between both worlds.

Technology empowers us to act locally, autonomously and in decentralized ways and my research objective is to, in a global context, find ways to govern, communicate and scale the impact of alternative monetary models. This with a special focus on achieving a more inclusive and community owned financial system.

As a Ph.D. fellow for the Agenda 2030 Graduate School, I expect to identify challenges and conflicting elements in the sustainability agenda, contribute with new perspectives, and create solutions for the challenges ahead

Liliana Perez Member since: Thursday, October 11, 2018 Full Member

B.Eng, Geomatics, Distrital University, Colombia, MSc., Geography, UPTC, Colombia, Ph.D., Geography, Simon Fraser University, Canada

My initial training was in cadastre and geodesy (B.Eng from the Distrital University, UD, Colombia). After earning my Master’s degree in Geography (UPTC, Colombia) in 2003, I worked for the “José Benito Vives de Andreis” marine and coastal research institute (INVEMAR) and for the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT). Three years later, in 2006, I left Colombia to come to Canada, where I began a PhD in Geography with a specialization in modelling complex systems at Simon Fraser University (SFU), under the direction of Dr. Suzana Dragicevic (SAMLab). In my dissertation I examined the topic of spatial and temporal modelling of insect epidemics and their complex behaviours. After obtaining my PhD in 2011, I began postdoctoral studies at the University of British Columbia (2011) and the University of Victoria (2011-2013), where I worked on issues concerning the spatial and temporal relationships between changes in indirect indicators of biodiversity and climate change.

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Montreal. My research interests center around the incorporation of artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques into the development Agent-Based Models to solve complex socio-ecological problems in different kind of systems, such as urban, forest and wetland ecosystems.

The core of my research projects aim to learn more about spatial and temporal interactions and relationships driving changes in our world, by focusing on the multidisciplinary nature of geographical information science (GIScience) to investigate the relationships between ecological processes and resulting spatial patterns. I integrate spatial analysis and modeling approaches from geographic information science (GIScience) together with computational intelligence methods and complex systems approaches to provide insights into complex problems such as climate change, landscape ecology and forestry by explicitly representing phenomena in their geographic context.

Specialties: Agent-based modeling, GIScience, Complex socio-environmental systems, Forestry, Ecology

Francesc Bellaubi Member since: Thursday, June 27, 2013

PhD candidate

performance of urban water service provision, high levels of inequities and inefficiency persist. In terms of water distribution and cost, these undesirable patterns have a high impact on peri-urban areas usually populated by marginalized and poor populations. The high levels of Non-Revenue Water (NRW), together with the existence of corrupt practices and mismanagement of water utilities, remain a highly controversial issue.

This situation confronts rent-seeking theory directly, explaining the performance-corruption relationship (Repetto, 1986). The presumption is that low performance in water supply service provision results from corruption because rent-seeking occurs. Hence, the implementation of performance-oriented reforms in the water supply sector, such as regulation or private sector participation, will reduce corruption, increasing the efficiency of water service provision. Nevertheless, latest evidence shows that “key elements of good political governance have a positive effect on the access to water services in developing countries. In turn, private sector participation has little influence other than increasing internal efficiency of water providers” (Krausse, 2009).

Indeed the relation between governance, corruption and performance seems to be more complex than theory wants to acknowledge. It must be reviewed further than a simple cause-effect relationship. It appears that poor management of water utilities, evidenced by high levels of NRW, justifies new investments. Such practices can be encouraged by an “opportunistic management”, whilst at the same time maintaining an influential “hydrocratic elite” in the sphere of water control.

The present research proposal aims to understand the relation between mismanagement and corruption of water control practices in water supply service provision. The research examines how this relationship affects the performance of water service provision and relates to water supply governance models at municipal peri-urban level in three African countries.

To understand the mismanagement-corruption relationship, we look at different case studies of water supply service provision in Senegal, Ghana and Kenya. Each case represents a different governance model in terms of management practices, institutional and organizational settings, and the actors in place, which affects the performance of water service provision in terms of allocative efficiency and access to water (equity). Whether regulation, decentralization and private sector participation constitute possible ways to reduce corruption is examined in the context of water sector reform.

In a second step, we propose a theoretical model based on Agent Based Modelling (ABM) (Pahl-Wostl, 2007) to reproduce complex social networks under a Socio-Ecological System (SES) framework approach. The model will allow us to test whether collaborative governance in the form of collective action in a participatory and negotiated decision-making process for water control, can reduce corruption and increase performance.

The present research benefits from the project “Transparency and Integrity in Service Delivery in Sub-Saharan Africa”. This project, carried out by Transparency International (TI) in 8 Sub-Saharan countries, aims to increase access to education, health and water by improving transparency and integrity in basic service delivery. The proposal retains focus on Senegal, Ghana and Kenya in the water sector.

Key words: water control, mismanagement, corruption, performance, collaborative governance, modelling, collective action, negotiation, participation

Enver Miguel Oruro Puma Member since: Tuesday, March 23, 2010 Full Member Reviewer

BA Psychology


http://learnmem.cshlp.org/content/27/1.cover-expansion
(Cover simulation using NetLogo, January 2020)
Enver Miguel Oruro, Grace V.E. Pardo, Aldo B. Lucion, Maria Elisa Calcagnotto and Marco A. P. Idiart. Maturation of pyramidal cells in anterior piriform cortex may be sufficient to explain the end of early olfactory learning in rats. Learn. Mem. 2020. 27: 20-32 © 2020 Oruro et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press


http://learnmem.cshlp.org/content/27/12.cover-expansion
(paper using NetLogo, December 2020)
Enver Miguel Oruro, Grace V.E. Pardo, Aldo B. Lucion, Maria Elisa Calcagnotto and Marco A. P. Idiart. The maturational characteristics of the GABA input in the anterior piriform cortex may also contribute to the rapid learning of the maternal odor during the sensitive period Learn. Mem. 2020. 27: 493-502 © 2020 Oruro et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

Enver Oruro, BA Psych. PhD(s).
Computational Psychologist
[email protected]
https://br.linkedin.com/in/enveroruro
Neurocomputational and Language Processing Laboratory, Institute of Physics/ UFRGS
Neurophysiology and Neurochemistry of Neuronal Excitability and Synaptic Plasticity Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry/ UFRGS

Meeting Organization

2009 First Meeting on Complex Systems -Neuroscience and Behavior Laboratory, School of Medicine UPCH Lima

2010 Second Meeting on Complex Systems - College of Psychologists of Peru / Colegio de Psicólogos del Perú (CPsP) Lima

2012 3rd Meeting on Complex Systems – Computational Social Psychology, /Neuroscience and Behavior Laboratory, School of Medicine UPCH Lima February 2012 https://www.comses.net/events/185/
http://www.neurocienciaperu.org/home/3ra-reunion-de-sistemas-complejos-psicologia-social-computacional
2012 4th Meeting on Complex Systems – Cognotecnology and Cognitive Science, Neuroscience and Behavior Laboratory, School of Medicine UPCH Lima July 2012 https://www.comses.net/events/212/

2014 5th Meeting on Complex Systems – Complexity Roadmap. The Imperial City of the Incas, Cusco, April. https://www.comses.net/events/312/

2015 Chair of “e-session on Neuroscience and Behavior” UNESCO UniTwin CS-DC’15
2015 Chair of “e-session on Social Psychology” UNESCO UniTwin CS-DC’15
CS-DC’15 (Complex Systems Digital Campus ’15 – World e-Conference) is organizing the e-satellites of CCS’15, the international Conference on Complex Systems. It is devoted to all scientists involved in the transdisciplinary challenges of complex systems, crossing theoretical questions with experimental observations of multi-level dynamics. CCS’15 is organized by the brand new ASU-SFI Center for Biosocial Complex Systems. Arizona State University, (USA) from Sept 28 to Oct 2, 2015, in close collaboration with the Complex Systems Society and the Santa Fe Institute. from http://cs-dc-15.org/

2018 Seminar in “Mother-Infant Attachment and Supercomputing”, NY. USA and Porto Alegre, Brazil, August 09. https://www.comses.net/events/499/

2019 Seminar in Experimental and Computational Studies on Mother-Infant Relationship October 8 and 15, 2019 ICBS, /Determine the neural pathways by which the nervous system of the neonates establish attachment with their mothers is a problem that has motivated hypothesis and experiments at several scale levels, from neurotransmission to ethological level. UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil. https://www.comses.net/events/549/

2020 Seminar in Maternal Infant Relationship Studies: Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence March 7 and 9
Goals 1. Discuss a Roadmap for mother-Infant relationship research in the framework of the UNESCO Complex System Digital Campus project. https://www.comses.net/events/570/ https://sites.google.com/view/envermiguel/seminar-in-maternal-infant-relationship-studies?read_current=1

Linea de investigacion: Estrategias de modelamiento en Psicobiologia y Psicologia Social
/ Linea estrategica 1: bases biologicas de la cognicion social desde sistemas complejos

Bruno Bonté Member since: Monday, February 13, 2017 Full Member

PhD in Computer Science applied to Modelling and Simulation, University of Montpellier 2, Master degree in Computer Science applied to Artificial Intelligence and Decision in Paris 6 University of Pierre and Marie Curry

Master Degree

I discovered at the same time Agent-Based Modeling method and Companion Modelling approach during my master degrees (engeenering and artificial intelligence and decision) internship at CIRAD in 2005 and 2006 where I had the opportunity to participate as a modeller to a ComMod process (Farolfi et al., 2010).

PhD

Then, during my PhD in computer Science applied to Modeling and Simulation, I learned the Theory of Modeling and Simulation and the Discrete EVent System specification formalism and proposed a conceptual, formal and operational framework to evaluate simulation models based on the way models are used instead of their ability to reproduce the target system behavior (Bonté et al., 2012). Applied to the surveillance of Epidemics, this work was rather theoritical but very educative and structuring to formulate my further models and research questions about modeling and simulation.

Post-Doc

From 2011 to 2013, I worked on viability theory applied to forest management at the Compex System Lab of Irstea (now Inrae) and learned about the interest of agregated models for analytical results (Bonté et al, 2012; Mathias et al, 2015).

G-EAU

Since 2013, I’m working for Inrae at the joint The Joint Research Unit “Water Management, Actors, Territories” (UMR G-EAU) where I’m involved in highly engaging interdisciplinary researches such as:
- The Multi-plateforme International Summer School about Agent Based Modelling and Simulation (MISSABMS)
- The development of the CORMAS (COmmon Pool Resources Multi-Agents Systems) agent-based modeling and simulation Platform (Bommel et al., 2019)
- Impacts of the adaptation to global changes using computerised serious games (Bonté et al., 2019; Bonté et al. , 2021)
- The use of experimentation to study social behaviors (Bonté et al. 2019b)
- The impact of information systems in SES trajectories (Paget et al., 2019a)
- Adaptation and transformations of traditional water management and infrastructures systems (Idda et al., 2017)
- Situational multi-agent approaches for collective irrigation (Richard et al., 2019)
- Combining psyhcological and economical experiments to study relations bewteen common pool resources situations, economical behaviours and psychological attitudes.

My research is about modelling and simulation of complex systems. My work is to use, and participate to the development of, integrative tools at the formal level (based on the Discrete EVent System Specification (DEVS) formalism), at the conceptual level (based on integrative paradigms of different forms such as Multi-Agents Systems paradigm (MAS), SES framework or viability theory), and at the level of the use of modelling and simulation for collective decision making (based on the Companion Modelling approach (ComMod)). Since 2013 and my integration in the G-EAU mixt research units, my object of studies were focused on multi-scale social and ecological systems, applied to water resource management and adaptation of territories to global change and I added experimentation to my research interest, developping methods combining agent-based model and human subjects actions.

This website uses cookies and Google Analytics to help us track user engagement and improve our site. If you'd like to know more information about what data we collect and why, please see our data privacy policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies.