Community

Furkan Gürsoy Member since: Thursday, August 02, 2018 Full Member

Ph.D., Management Information Systems, Boğaziçi University, M.Sc., Data Science, Istanbul Şehir University, B.Sc., Management Information Systems, Boğaziçi University

Furkan Gürsoy received the BS in Management Information Systems from Boğaziçi University, Turkey, and the MS in Data Science from İstanbul Şehir University, Turkey. He is currently a PhD Candidate at Boğaziçi University. He previously worked as an IS/IT Consultant and a Machine Learning Engineer with the industry for several years. He held a Visiting Researcher Position with IMT Atlantique, France, in 2020. His research interests include complex networks, machine learning, simulation, and broad data science.

network science, machine learning, simulation, data science.

Kit Martin Member since: Thursday, January 15, 2015

B.A. History, Bard College, M.A. International Development Practice Humphrey School of Public Affairs

Studying the negative externalities of networks, and the ways in which those negatives feedback and support the continuities.

David Earnest Member since: Saturday, March 13, 2010 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. in political science (2004), M.A. in security policy studies (1994)

Two themes unite my research: a commitment to methodological creativity and innovation as expressed in my work with computational social sciences, and an interest in the political economy of “globalization,” particularly its implications for the ontological claims of international relations theory.

I have demonstrated how the methods of computational social sciences can model bargaining and social choice problems for which traditional game theory has found only indeterminate and multiple equilibria. My June 2008 article in International Studies Quarterly (“Coordination in Large Numbers,” vol. 52, no. 2) illustrates that, contrary to the expectation of collective action theory, large groups may enjoy informational advantages that allow players with incomplete information to solve difficult three-choice coordination games. I extend this analysis in my 2009 paper at the International Studies Association annual convention, in which I apply ideas from evolutionary game theory to model learning processes among players faced with coordination and commitment problems. Currently I am extending this research to include social network theory as a means of modeling explicitly the patterns of interaction in large-n (i.e. greater than two) player coordination and cooperation games. I argue in my paper at the 2009 American Political Science Association annual convention that computational social science—the synthesis of agent-based modeling, social network analysis and evolutionary game theory—empowers scholars to analyze a broad range of previously indeterminate bargaining problems. I also argue this synthesis gives researchers purchase on two of the central debates in international political economy scholarship. By modeling explicitly processes of preference formation, computational social science moves beyond the rational actor model and endogenizes the processes of learning that constructivists have identified as essential to understanding change in the international system. This focus on the micro foundations of international political economy in turn allows researchers to understand how social structural features emerge and constrain actor choices. Computational social science thus allows IPE to formalize and generalize our understandings of mutual constitution and systemic change, an observation that explains the paradoxical interest of constructivists like Ian Lustick and Matthew Hoffmann in the formal methods of computational social science. Currently I am writing a manuscript that develops these ideas and applies them to several challenges of globalization: developing institutions to manage common pool resources; reforming capital adequacy standards for banks; and understanding cascading failures in global networks.

While computational social science increasingly informs my research, I have also contributed to debates about the epistemological claims of computational social science. My chapter with James N. Rosenau in Complexity in World Politics (ed. by Neil E. Harrison, SUNY Press 2006) argues that agent-based modeling suffers from underdeveloped and hidden epistemological and ontological commitments. On a more light-hearted note, my article in PS: Political Science and Politics (“Clocks, Not Dartboards,” vol. 39, no. 3, July 2006) discusses problems with pseudo-random number generators and illustrates how they can surprise unsuspecting teachers and researchers.

Ian Dennis Miller Member since: Tuesday, February 16, 2016 Full Member

MA Social Psychology, BS Cognitive Science

PhD student at University of Toronto: memes, social networks, contagion, agent based modeling, synthetic populations

Gayanga Herath Member since: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 Full Member

Master's degree in Information Technology, Management & Organisational Change at Lancaster University, Bachelor of Engineering (BEng) (Hons) in Computer Networks And Security at Staffordshire University, PhD in Organizational Cognition at University of Southern Denmark (Present)

An ambitious and driven individual with knowledge and project experience in computer networks and security (BEng (Hons)), along with a masters degree at a top 10 UK university in the domain of IT, management and organizational change with a distinction, and is currently working as a Ph.D. Research fellow in Denmark.

Current Ph.D. Project - Work Improvisation, looking into more flexible and plastic management through cognition.

Organizational Cognition
Organizational behaviour
Organizational change
Gamification
Fit
Recruitment & Selection
Distribted Cognition

Dino Mujadzevic Member since: Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Ph.d., A. v. Humboldt postdoctoral researcher

Discourse and networks executing and supporting Turkish foreign policy under AK Party (since 2002) on example of Bosnia and Herzegovina; Spreading of ideas of contemporary “Turkish economic model” abroad

I Schubert Member since: Thursday, March 12, 2015

PhD student

My PHD project focuses on understanding factors influencing individual sustainable consumption behaviour and how these factors could promote a sustainability transition.

André Calero Valdez Member since: Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Dr. phil.

André Calero Valdez does research on Computational Communication Science investigating the influence of network structure and algorithms on communication flow using agent-based modeling.

Juan Ocampo Member since: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 Full Member

PhD Candidate at Lund School of Economics and Management - Sweden, (2019) MSocSc Organizational Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Copenhagen Business School, (2016) MSc in Industrial Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, (2012) Industrial Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

I am Colombian with passion for social impact. I believe that change starts at the individual, community, local and then global level. I have set my goal in making a better experience to whatever challenges I encounter and monetary systems and governance models is what concerns me at the time.

In my path to understanding and reflecting about these issues I have found my way through “Reflexive Modeling”. Models are just limited abstractions of reality and is part of our job as researchers to dig in the stories behind our models and learn to engage in a dialogue between both worlds.

Technology empowers us to act locally, autonomously and in decentralized ways and my research objective is to, in a global context, find ways to govern, communicate and scale the impact of alternative monetary models. This with a special focus on achieving a more inclusive and community owned financial system.

As a Ph.D. fellow for the Agenda 2030 Graduate School, I expect to identify challenges and conflicting elements in the sustainability agenda, contribute with new perspectives, and create solutions for the challenges ahead

Zhanli Sun Member since: Thursday, January 27, 2011 Full Member Reviewer

PhD

Agent based modelling;
Land use/land cover change;
Payment for ecosystem services;
Bayesian Network;
System Dynamics

This website uses cookies and Google Analytics to help us track user engagement and improve our site. If you'd like to know more information about what data we collect and why, please see our data privacy policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies.