Community

Christophe Le Page Member since: Friday, July 06, 2007 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. Biomathematics, Paris 6 University, M.Sc. Biomathematics, Paris 7 University, Engineering Degree, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences Center, AgroCampus Ouest (Rennes)

Christophe Le Page currently works at the Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD). Christophe does research on participatory modelling of the interactions between agriculture and the environment, focusing more specifically on the relationships among stakeholders about the management of natural renewable resources. Christophe is designing and using interactive agent-based simulation and role-playing games. He is an active member of the Companion Modelling research group.

Agent-based simulations and role-playing games in the field of renewable resource management.

Gayanga Herath Member since: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 Full Member

Master's degree in Information Technology, Management & Organisational Change at Lancaster University, Bachelor of Engineering (BEng) (Hons) in Computer Networks And Security at Staffordshire University, PhD in Organizational Cognition at University of Southern Denmark (Present)

An ambitious and driven individual with knowledge and project experience in computer networks and security (BEng (Hons)), along with a masters degree at a top 10 UK university in the domain of IT, management and organizational change with a distinction, and is currently working as a Ph.D. Research fellow in Denmark.

Current Ph.D. Project - Work Improvisation, looking into more flexible and plastic management through cognition.

Organizational Cognition
Organizational behaviour
Organizational change
Gamification
Fit
Recruitment & Selection
Distribted Cognition

Vojtech Kase Member since: Friday, February 20, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

MA

I am interested in the dynamics of cultural transmission, especially in diffusion of religious innovations (concepts and practices) across a population. In my dissertation, I am targeting this issue while studying and modelling the development of Christian meal practices in the first four centuries CE across the Roman Mediterranean.

C Michael Barton Member since: Thursday, May 10, 2007 Full Member Reviewer

PhD University of Arizona (Anthropology/Geosciences), MA University of Arizona (Anthropology/Geosciences), BA University of Kansas (Anthropology)

Professor, School of Human Evolution & Social Change
Professor, School of Complex Adaptive Systems
Affiliate Professor, School of Earth and Space Exploration
Arizona State University

My interests center around long-term human ecology and landscape dynamics with ongoing projects in the Mediterranean (late Pleistocene through mid-Holocene) and recent work in the American Southwest (Holocene-Archaic). I’ve done fieldwork in Spain, Bosnia, and various locales in North America and have expertise in hunter/gatherer and early farming societies, geoarchaeology, lithic technology, and evolutionary theory, with an emphasis on human/environmental interaction, landscape dynamics, and techno-economic change.

Quantitative methods are critical to archaeological research, and socioecological sciences in general. They are an important focus of my research, especially emphasizing dynamic modeling, spatial technologies (including GIS and remote sensing), statistical analysis, and visualization. I am a member of the open source GRASS GIS international development team that is making cutting edge spatial technologies available to researchers and students around the world.

Jessica Turnley Member since: Monday, July 13, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

B.A. Anthropology/English Lit, Univ of California, Santa Cruz, 1974, M.A. Social Anthropology, Univ of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1977, M.A. Cultural Anthropology, Cornell University, 1978, Ph.D. Anthropology/SE Asian Studies, Cornell University, 1983

I am interested in questions of method, and in the application of computational social models to a wide variety of national security questions (such as counterterrorism and counterinsurgency) as well as decision-making around complex natural resources such as water. My methods interest center on the use of qualitative social theory to inform the structure of computational social models, and the ways in which such models handle qualitative data. This raises questions around the nature of data and the ways in which computational social models convey information to decision-makers.

Sae Schatz Member since: Tuesday, November 04, 2014

Modeling and Simulation, Ph.D., Modeling and Simulation, M.S., Computer Information Technology, B.S.

Sae Schatz, Ph.D., is an applied human–systems researcher, professional facilitator, and cognitive scientist. Her work focuses on human–systems integration (HSI), with an emphasis on human cognition and learning, instructional technologies, adaptive systems, human performance assessment, and modeling and simulation (M&S). Frequently, her work seeks to enhance individual’s higher-order cognitive skills (i.e., the mental, emotional, and relational skills associated with “cognitive readiness”).

Saeed Moradi Member since: Thursday, June 04, 2020

Dr. Saeed Moradi received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. Saeed has 11+ years of experience in research, policymaking, housing sector, construction management, and structural engineering. His career developed his enthusiasm for the enhancement of post-disaster recovery plans. Through his research on disaster recovery, community resilience, and human-centered complex systems, Saeed aims to bridge the gap between social sciences and civil/infrastructure engineering.

Community and Infrastructure Resilience
Disaster Recovery
Complex Systems Modeling
Agent-Based Modeling
System Dynamics
Machine Learning
Pattern Recognition
Data Mining
Spatial Analysis and Modeling
Construction Management
Building Information Modeling

Marco Janssen Member since: Thursday, May 10, 2007 Full Member Reviewer

M.A., Econometrics and Operations Research, March, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, PhD., Mathematics, 29 November, Maastricht University (Supervisors: J. Rotmans and O.J. Vrieze)

I am a Professor in the School of Sustainability and the Director of the Center for Behavior, Institutions and the Environment. I want to understand how people solve collective problems at different levels of scale, especially those problems related to sustainability of our environment. Our society experience unprecedented challenged to sustain common resource for future generations at a scale we have never experienced before. What makes groups cooperate? What is the role of information? How does the ecological context affect the social fabric? How do they deal with a changing environment? How can we use these insight to address global challenges? To do this research I combine behavioral experiments, agent-based modeling and case study analysis.

Omar Guerrero Member since: Friday, January 30, 2015

PhD

My interests lie in the intersection of economics, networks, and computation. I am currently studying labour dynamics as a process where people flow throughout the economy by moving from one firm to another. I study these flows by looking at detailed data about employment histories of each individual and every firm in entire economies. Using this information, I construct networks of firms in order to map the roads that people take throughout their careers. This allows to study labour markets at an unprecedented fine-grained level of detail. I employ agent-based computing methods to understand how economic shocks and policies alter labour flows, which eventually translate into unemployment and other related problems.

koene Member since: Sunday, March 25, 2012

PhD, MSc

My core research interest is to understand how humans and other living creature perceive and behave; respond and act upon their environment and how this dynamic interplay shapes us into who we are. In recognition of the broad scope of this question I am a strong believer in the need for inter- and multi-disciplinary approaches and have worked at research groups in a wide range of departments and institutions, including university departments of Physics as well as Psychology, a bio-medical research lab, a robotics research laboratory and most recently the RIKEN Brain Science Institute. Though my work has primarily taken the form of computational neuroscience I have also performed psychophysical experiments with healthy human subjects, been involved in neural imaging experiments and contributed towards the development of a humanoid robot.

Based on the philosophy of ‘understanding through creating’ I believe that bio-mimetic and biologically inspired computational and robotic engineering can teach us not only how to build more flexible and robust tools but also how actual living creatures deal with their environment. I am therefore a strong believer in the fertile information exchange between scientific as well as engineering research disciplines.

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