Community

Simon Briner Member since: Monday, January 30, 2012

MSc ETH in Agroecosystem Science

Samantha Dobbie Member since: Tuesday, April 30, 2013

MRes in Conservation and Utlisation of Plant Genetic Resources, BSc in Biological Sciences with Honours in Plant Sciences

Sara Mcphee-Knowles Member since: Wednesday, March 05, 2014

PhD Candidate, Public Policy, Bachelor of Arts in Public Administration, 2009

My dissertation research at the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy focuses on food safety and consumer choices, using agent-based models as a novel method for investigating this policy space.

Jonathan Gillligan Member since: Friday, June 16, 2017 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. Yale University (Physics) 1991

Integrating social and natural science to study coupled human-natural systems, and particularly the interactions of society with the physical environment under conditions of environmental stress.

Andrew Bell Member since: Thursday, January 23, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

PhD, Natural Resource Management, University of Michigan

Andrew Bell (Ph.D. 2010, Michigan) was a Research Fellow in the Environment and Production Technology Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, DC. His current research portfolio focuses on the use of field instruments – such as discrete choice experiments, framed field experiments, randomized control trials – to inform behavior in agent-based models of coupled human-natural systems. Prior to this post, Andrew was a post-doctoral research fellow at The Earth Institute at Columbia University, where he focused on developing applications for paleo-climate histories.

Birgit Müller Member since: Wednesday, October 26, 2011 Full Member Reviewer

PhD, Head of Junior Research Group POLISES

I am currently head of the Junior Research Group POLISES which uses agent-based models to study intended and unintended effects of global policy instruments on the social-ecological resilience of smallholders. In this project, we focus on the impact of policies targeting climate risk in two common property regimes of pastoralists in Africa (Morocco and Kenya/Ethiopia).
On a conceptual level, I work in an international team of modellers, psychologists and natural scientists on adequate representations of human behaviour in agent-based models. Furthermore, I am interested in how to describe models in an appropriate and standardised manner to increase their comprehensibility and comparison.

Gunnar Dressler Member since: Monday, February 22, 2016 Full Member Reviewer

PhD Applied Systems Science, Dipl. Biomathematics
  • since April 2017: PostDoc at the Department of Ecological Modeling, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ
  • since January 2015: Member of the Junior Research Group POLISES - Global food security policies and their social-ecological side effects in regions prone to global change.
  • 2012-2017 PhD student at the Department of Ecological Modeling, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ
  • 2006-2011 Diploma in Biomathematics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University of Greifswald
  1. Dynamics of socio-ecological resource use systems
    • Pasture use in dryland grazing systems under change, effects of new technologies and policy instruments, emergence of polarization between pastoralists (e.g. in terms of livestock numbers).
    • Thresholds of disaster management performance under change, loss of manpower, the role of information as critical resource.
  2. Human decision making in agent-based models.
  3. Remote sensing and GIS.

Kit Martin Member since: Thursday, January 15, 2015 Full Member

B.A. History, Bard College, M.A. International Development Practice Humphrey School of Public Affairs, PhD. Northwestern, Learning Sciences

I have a strong background in building and incorporating agent-based simulations for learning. Throughout my graduate career, I have worked at the Center for Connected Learning and Computer Based Modeling (CCL), developing modeling and simulation tools for learning. In particular, we develop NetLogo, the gold standard agent-based modeling environment for learners around the world. In my dissertation work, I marry biology and computer science to teach the emergent principles of ant colonies foraging for food and expanding. The work builds on more than a decade of experience in ABM. I now work at the Center for the Science and the Schools as an Assistant Professor. We delivered a curriculum to teach about COVID-19, where I incorporated ABMs into the curriculum.

You can keep up with my work at my webpage: https://kitcmartin.com

Studying the negative externalities of networks, and the ways in which those negatives feedback and support the continuities.

Isaac Ullah Member since: Monday, March 27, 2017 Full Member Reviewer

PhD, Anthropology, Arizona State University, MA, Anthropology, University of Toronto, BSc, Anthropology, University of California, Davis

Isaac IT Ullah, PhD, (Arizona State University 2013) Dr. Ullah is a computational archaeologist who employs GIS and simulation modeling to understand the long-term dynamics of humans and the Earth System. Dr. Ullah is particularly interested in the social and environmental changes surrounding the advent of farming and animal husbandry. His focus is on Mediterranean and other semi-arid landscapes, and he conducts fieldwork in Jordan, Italy, and Kazakhstan. His field work includes survey for and excavation of early agricultural sites as well as geoarchaeological analyses of anthropogenic landscapes. His specialties include landscape evolution, complex adaptive systems science, computational methods, geospatial analysis, and imagery analysis.

Computational Archaeology, Food Production, Forager-Farmer transition, Neolithic, Agro-pastoralism, Erosion Modeling, Anthropogenic Landscapes, Geoarchaeology, Modeling and Simulation, GIS, Imagery Analysis, ABM, Mediterranean

Nicholas Magliocca Member since: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 Full Member

My broad research interests are in human-environmental interactions and land-use change. Specifically, I am interested in how people make land-use decisions, how those decisions modify the functioning of natural systems, and how those modifications feedback on human well-being, livelihoods, and subsequent land-use decisions. All of my research begins with a complex systems background with the aim of understanding the dynamics of human-environment interactions and their consequences for environmental and economic sustainability. Agent-based modeling is my primary tool of choice to understand human-environment interactions, but I also frequently use other land change modeling approaches (e.g., cellular automata, system dynamics, econometrics), spatial statistics, and GIS. I also have expertise in synthesis methods (e.g., meta-analysis) for bringing together leveraging disparate forms of social and environmental data to understand how specific cases (i.e., local) of land-use change contribute to and/or differ from broader-scale (i.e. regional or global) patterns of human-environment interactions and land change outcomes.

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