Community

Derek Robinson Member since: Wednesday, November 05, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

The goal of my research program is to improve our understanding about highly integrated natural and human processes. Within the context of Land-System Science, I seek to understand how natural and human systems interact through feedback mechanisms and affect land management choices among humans and ecosystem (e.g., carbon storage) and biophysical processes (e.g., erosion) in natural systems. One component of this program involves finding novel methods for data collection (e.g., unmanned aerial vehicles) that can be used to calibrate and validate models of natural systems at the resolution of decision makers. Another component of this program involves the design and construction of agent-based models to formalize our understanding of human decisions and their interaction with their environment in computer code. The most exciting, and remaining part, is coupling these two components together so that we may not only quantify the impact of representing their coupling, but more importantly to assess the impacts of changing climate, technology, and policy on human well-being, patterns of land use and land management, and ecological and biophysical aspects of our environment.

To achieve this overarching goal, my students and I conduct fieldwork that involves the use of state-of-the-art unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in combination with ground-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR) equipment, RTK global positioning system (GPS) receivers, weather and soil sensors, and a host of different types of manual measurements. We bring these data together to make methodological advancements and benchmark novel equipment to justify its use in the calibration and validation of models of natural and human processes. By conducting fieldwork at high spatial resolutions (e.g., parcel level) we are able to couple our representation of natural system processes at the scale at which human actors make decisions and improve our understanding about how they react to changes and affect our environment.

land use; land management; agricultural systems; ecosystem function; carbon; remote sensing; field measurements; unmanned aerial vehicle; human decision-making; erosion, hydrological, and agent-based modelling

Arika Ligmann-Zielinska Member since: Tuesday, April 08, 2008 Full Member Reviewer

PhD

I am a spatial (GIS) agent-based modeler i.e. modeler that simulates the impact of various individual decisions on the environment. My work is mainly methodological i.e. I develop tools that make agent-based modeling (ABM) easier to do. I especially focus on developing tools that allow for evaluating various uncertainties in ABM. One of these uncertainties are the ways of quantifying agent decisions (i.e. the algorithmic representation of agent decision rules) for example to address the question of “How do the agents decide whether to grow crops or rather put land to fallow?”. One of the methods I developed focuses on representing residential developers’ risk perception for example to answer the question: “to what extent is the developer risk-taking and would be willing to build new houses targeted at high-income families (small market but big return on investment)?”. Other ABM uncertainties that I evaluate are various spatial inputs (e.g. different representations of soil erosion, different maps of environmental benefits from land conservation) and various demographics (i.e. are retired farmers more willing to put land to conservation?). The tools I develop are mostly used in (spatial) sensitivity analysis of ABM (quantitative, qualitative, and visual).

Janice Ser Huay Lee Member since: Tuesday, October 14, 2014

PhD in Environmental Systems Science

Modeling land use change from smallholder agricultural intensification

Agricultural expansion in the rural tropics brings much needed economic and social development in developing countries. On the other hand, agricultural development can result in the clearing of biologically-diverse and carbon-rich forests. To achieve both development and conservation objectives, many government policies and initiatives support agricultural intensification, especially in smallholdings, as a way to increase crop production without expanding farmlands. However, little is understood regarding how different smallholders might respond to such investments for yield intensification. It is also unclear what factors might influence a smallholder’s land-use decision making process. In this proposed research, I will use a bottom-up approach to evaluate whether investments in yield intensification for smallholder farmers would really translate to sustainable land use in Indonesia. I will do so by combining socioeconomic and GIS data in an agent-based model (Land-Use Dynamic Simulator multi-agent simulation model). The outputs of my research will provide decision makers with new and contextualized information to assist them in designing agricultural policies to suit varying socioeconomic, geographic and environmental contexts.

Angelos Chliaoutakis Member since: Thursday, March 26, 2020

Ph.D., Computer Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Greece

Angelos Chliaoutakis received his PhD in Electronic & Computer Engineering in 2020 at Technical University of Crete (TUC), Greece. During 2005-2020 he was a research assistant at the Intelligent Systems Laboratory of TUC, participating in several research projects associated with NLP, semantic similarity and ontology based information systems. Since 2010 he is also a research assistant at the Laboratory of Geophysical - Satellite Remote Sensing and Archaeo-environment (GeoSat ReSeArch Lab) of the Institute for Mediterranean Studies of Foundation for Research and Technology (IMS-FORTH), were he is involved in various research projects related to the full-stack development of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), web-based GIS applications and Geoinformatics in the cultural and archaeological domain. This ultimately transformed his interest and research direction towards computational archaeology, in particular, agent-based modeling and simulation, while intertwining ideas and approaches from Artificial Intelligence, Multi-agent Systems and GIS.

Research activities range between Computer Science, Information Systems and Natural Language Processing (NLP), Agent-based modeling/simulation (ABM), Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) and Geographical Information Science (GIScience).

Claudine Gravel-Miguel Member since: Thursday, November 01, 2012 Full Member Reviewer

M.A., Anthropology, University of Victoria, Ph.D., Anthropology, Arizona State University

Dr. Gravel-Miguel currently works as a Postdoctoral Research Scholar for the Institute of Human Origins at Arizona State University. She does research in Archaeology and focuses on the Upper Paleolithic of Southwest Europe. She currently works on projects ranging from cultural transmission to human-environment interactions in prehistory.

Archaeology, GIS, ABM, social networks, portable art, ornaments, data science

Roope Oskari Kaaronen Member since: Monday, August 26, 2019 Full Member

I am a multidisciplinary researcher (PhD Candidate) at the University of Helsinki. My research interests include sustainable behaviour change, ecological psychology, cognitive science and cultural evolution. I have a soft spot for complex systems and philosophy of science.

GitHub: https://github.com/roopekaaronen/

Ecological Psychology
Environmental Policy
Philosophy of Science
Cognitive Science
Ecological Rationality
Science & Society
Complex Systems
Agent-Based Modeling

Fabio Correa Duran Member since: Sunday, March 15, 2015

Physicist, Ms. C. Physics

I have been working in the software implementation of different kinds of complex networks inspired in real-life populations. My software may be classified on several categories: complex networks, Aedes aegypti development, dengue epidemics, cultural behavior of populations. I am also researching in education of Deaf people in Colombia.

Chris Bone Member since: Thursday, July 16, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

BA, Environmental Studies, University of Toronto

Research focuses on the coupled dynamics of human and natural systems, specifically in the context of forest dynamics. I utilize a variety of modeling and analysis techniques, including agent-based modeling, cellular automata, machine learning and various spatial statistics and GIS-related methods. I am currently involved in projects that investigate the anthropogenic and biological drivers behind native and invasive forest pathogens and insects.

Inês Boavida-Portugal Member since: Monday, October 24, 2016

PhD in Geography, research area GIScience, MsC in Territorial Managgement, Bachelor in Geography and Regional Planning

I am a geographer interested in exploring tourism system dynamics and assessing tourism’s role in environmental sustainability using agent-based modelling (ABM). My current work focus is on human complex systems interactions with the environment and on the application of tools (such as scenario analysis, network analysis and ABM) to explore topics systems adaptation, vulnerability and resilience to global change. I am also interested in looking into my PhD future research directions which pointed the potential of Big Data, social media and Volunteer Geographical Information to increase destination awareness.
I have extensive experience in GIS, quantitative and qualitative methods of research. My master thesis assessed the potential for automatic feature extraction from QuickBird imagery for municipal management purposes. During my PhD I have published and submitted several scientific papers in ISI indexed journals. I have a good research network in Portugal and I integrate an international research network on the topic “ABM meets tourism”. I am a collaborator in a recently awarded USA NCRCRD grant project “Using Agent Based Modelling to Understand and Enhance Rural Tourism Industry Collaboration” and applied for NSF funding with the project “Understanding and Enhancing the Resilience of Recreation and Tourism Dependent Communities in the Gulf”.

Timothy Waring Member since: Thursday, August 18, 2011 Full Member Reviewer

PhD, Human Ecology, University of California, Davis

I study human culture and cooperation in relationship to the environment. In particular, I study how social norms, institutions and societies evolve, and how they are influenced by ecological and social forces. I strive to use this research to learn how to better build durable, sustainable and just institutions and societies. I use experimental economics and agent-based modeling to explore these connections, and work with lot of wonderful people.

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