Community

Bhakti Onggo Member since: Wednesday, August 07, 2013 Full Member Reviewer

I am an Associate Professor of Data Analytics at Trinity Business School, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. I was the Director of Postgraduate Teaching at the Department of Management Science, Lancaster University Management School overseeing MSc programmes in Business Analytics, Management Science and Marketing Analytics, Logistics and Supply Chain Management, e-Business and Innovation, and Project Management.

My research interests lie in the areas of predictive analytics using simulation. I am particularly interested in simulation modelling methodology (symbiotic simulation, hybrid modelling, agent-based simulation, discrete-event simulation) with applications in operations and supply chain management (e.g. hospital, manufacturing, transportation, warehouse) and social dynamics (e.g. diffusion of perception). Currently, I am the associate editor of the Journal of Simulation and the secretary of The OR Society‘s Special Interest Group in Simulation. I am the track coordinator of Agent-Based Simulation for the Winter Simulation Conference 2018.

Fabian Adelt Member since: Monday, November 20, 2017

Computer Studies, Diploma-Degree

Fabian Adelt graduated in computer-sciences with a minor in sociology of technology (degree: Diplom-Informatiker) at TU Dortmund University in 2011. Currently, he is research fellow at the Technology Studies Group and involved in the project “Collaborative Data- and Risk-Management in Future Grids – A Simulation Study” (KoRiSim). Between 2012 and 2015 he worked on the project “Mixed Modes of Governance as a Means of Risk Management in Complex Systems” (RiskSim). His research interests entail agent-based modelling and simulating of socio-technical systems, especially focussing on governance issues and actors’ reactions on interventions. Experience covers the fields of mobility and energy.

Eric Kameni Member since: Monday, October 19, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. (Computer Science) - Modelisation and Application, Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS) and Institute for Science, Innovation and Society (ISIS), Faculty of Science, Radboud University, Netherland, Master’s degree with Thesis, University of Yaounde I

Eric Kameni holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science option modeling and application from the Radboud University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands, after a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science in Application Development and a Diploma in Master’s degree with Thesis in Computer Science on “modeling the diffusion of trust in social networks” at the University of Yaoundé I in Cameroon. My doctoral thesis focused on developing a model-based development approach for designing ICT-based solutions to solve environmental problems (Natural Model based Design in Context (NMDC)).

The particular focus of the research is the development of a spatial and Agent-Based Model to capture the motivations underlying the decision making of the various actors towards the investments in the quality of land and institutions, or other aspects of land use change. Inductive models (GIS and statistical based) can extrapolate existing land use patterns in time but cannot include actors decisions, learning and responses to new phenomena, e.g. new crops or soil conservation techniques. Therefore, more deductive (‘theory-driven’) approaches need to be used to complement the inductive (‘data-driven’) methods for a full grip on transition processes. Agent-Based Modeling is suitable for this work, in view of the number and types of actors (farmer, sedentary and transhumant herders, gender, ethnicity, wealth, local and supra-local) involved in land use and management. NetLogo framework could be use to facilitate modeling because it portray some desirable characteristics (agent based and spatially explicit). The model develop should provide social and anthropological insights in how farmers work and learn.

Klaus G. Troitzsch Member since: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 Full Member

Klaus G. Troitzsch was a full professor of computer applications in the social sciences at the University of Koblenz-Landau since 1986 until he officially retired in 2012 (but continues his academic activities). He took his first degree as a political scientist. After eight years in active politics in Hamburg and after having taken his PhD, he returned to academia, first as a senior researcher in an election research project at the University of Koblenz-Landau, from 1986 as full professor of computer applications in the social sciences. His main interests in teaching and research are social science methodology and, especially, modelling and simulation in the social sciences.
Among his early research projects there is the MIMOSE project which developed a declarative functional simulation language and tool for micro and multilevel simulation between 1986 and 1992. Several EU funded projects were devoted to social simulation and policy modelling, the most recent from 2012 to 2015 combining data/text mining and agent-based simulation to analyse the global dynamics of extortion racket systems.
He authored, co-authored, and co-edited several books and many articles in social simulation, and he organised or co-organised a number of national and international conferences in this field. Over nearly three decades he advised and/or supervised more than 55 PhD theses, most of them in the field of social simulation. He offered annual summer and spring courses in social simulation between 1997 and 2009; more recent courses of this kind are now being organised by the European Social Simulation Assiciation and held at different places all over Europe (mostly with his contributions).

Computational social science, structuralist theory reconstruction

Christian Vincenot Member since: Friday, November 13, 2020 Full Member

Master in Computer Science, Louis Pasteur University, Strasbourg, France, Ph.D. in Social Informatics, Kyoto University, Japan

Prof. Christian E. Vincenot is by nature an interdisciplinary researcher with broad scientific interests. He majored in Computer Science / Embedded Systems (i.e. IoT) at the Université Louis Pasteur (Strasbourg, France) while working professionally in the field of Computer Networking and Security. He then switched the focus of his work towards Computational Modelling, writing his doctoral dissertation on Hybrid Modelling in Ecology, and was awarded a PhD in Social Informatics by Kyoto University in 2011 under a scholarship by the Japanese Ministry of Research. He subsequently started a parallel line of research in Conservation Biology (esp. human-bat conflicts) under a postdoctoral fellowship of the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) (2012-2014). This led him to create the Island Bat Research Group (www.batresearch.net), which he is still coordinating to this date. In 2014, he was appointed as the tenured Assistant Professor of the Biosphere Informatics Laboratory at Kyoto University. He also been occupying editorial roles for the journals PLOS ONE, Frontiers in Environmental Science, and Biology. In 2020, he created Ariana Technologies (www.ariana-tech.com), a start-up operating in the field of Data Science/Simulation and IoT for crisis management.

Prof. Vincenot’s main research interests lie in the theoretical development of Hybrid Mechanistic Simulation approaches based on Individual/Agent-Based Modeling and System Dynamics, and in their applications to a broad range of systems, with particular focus on Ecology.

Andrew White Member since: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 Full Member Reviewer

PhD Anthropology, MA Anthropology, BA Anthropology; BA Journalism

I am an anthropological archaeologist with broad interests in hunter-gatherers, lithic technology, human evolution, and complex systems theory. I am particularly interested in understanding processes of long term social, evolutionary, and adaptational change among hunter-gatherers, specifically by using approaches that combine archaeological data, ethnographic data, and computational modeling.

Jessica Turnley Member since: Monday, July 13, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

B.A. Anthropology/English Lit, Univ of California, Santa Cruz, 1974, M.A. Social Anthropology, Univ of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1977, M.A. Cultural Anthropology, Cornell University, 1978, Ph.D. Anthropology/SE Asian Studies, Cornell University, 1983

I am interested in questions of method, and in the application of computational social models to a wide variety of national security questions (such as counterterrorism and counterinsurgency) as well as decision-making around complex natural resources such as water. My methods interest center on the use of qualitative social theory to inform the structure of computational social models, and the ways in which such models handle qualitative data. This raises questions around the nature of data and the ways in which computational social models convey information to decision-makers.

Ismael Chaile Member since: Wednesday, December 11, 2013 Full Member Reviewer

Ph.D. with research line in Multi-agent systems and Distributed systems (robots, IoT), Master In Science in Micro and Nanoelectronic, Master in General Direcction and Strategic Planning, Electronic Engineer

I have been researching in synchronization between agent-based-models (ABM) and multi robot systems used in logistic and manufacturing. I use Netlogo as ABM.
I develop and agile methodology to use the same ABM as supervisory control and data aquisition (SCADA). The framework works fine and I test it in two SCADAs, which you can see in my youtube channel (http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJIb_UL-ak98F5OZxOHL0FQ).

Moira Zellner Member since: Friday, December 06, 2013 Full Member

PhD, Urban and Regional Planning, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Dr. Moira Zellner is an associate professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago in the Department of Urban Planning and Policy, the director of the Urban Data Visualization lab, and is a research associate professor in the Institute for Environmental Science and Policy at UIC. Dr. Zellner has served as Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator in interdisciplinary projects examining how specific policy, technological and behavioral factors influence the emergence and impacts of a range of complex environmental problems, where interaction effects make responsibilities and burdens unclear. Her research also examines the value of complexity-based modeling for participatory policy exploration and social learning with stakeholders and decision-makers. Dr. Zellner also teaches a variety of workshops on complexity-based modeling of socio-ecological systems, for training of both scientists and decision-makers.

Applications of agent-based modeling to urban and environmental planning

Richard Harmon Member since: Friday, September 15, 2017

PhD - Economics, Georgetown Univ
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