Community

Bernardo Furtado Member since: Monday, January 27, 2014 Full Member

PhD Geosciences/Economics, MsC Geography, BA Architecture

Tenured researcher @ government think-tank (IPEA) and CNPq (productivity grant - since 2014), complex modeler interested, data fan, transitional Python user, PhD. Background in urban analysis, economics, geography. From twitter.com/furtadobb

Agent-based modeling, urban policy, urban economics. Metropolis and municipalities analyses.

Claudine Gravel-Miguel Member since: Thursday, November 01, 2012 Full Member Reviewer

M.A., Anthropology, University of Victoria, Ph.D., Anthropology, Arizona State University

Dr. Gravel-Miguel currently works as a Postdoctoral Research Scholar for the Institute of Human Origins at Arizona State University. She does research in Archaeology and focuses on the Upper Paleolithic of Southwest Europe. She currently works on projects ranging from cultural transmission to human-environment interactions in prehistory.

Archaeology, GIS, ABM, social networks, portable art, ornaments, data science

Julia Kasmire Member since: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 Full Member

MSc in Evolution of Language and Cognition, BA in Linguistics

About me
Name: Dr. Julia Kasmire
Position: Post-doctoral Research Fellow
Where: UK Data Services and Cathie Marsh Institute at the University of Manchester.
Short Bio
2004 - BA in Linguistics from the University of California in Santa Cruz, including college honours, departmental honours and one year of study at the University of Barcelona.
2008 - MSc in the Evolution of Language and Cognition from the University of Edinburgh, with a thesis on the effects of various common simulated population features used when modelling language learning agents.
2015 - PhD from Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management at the Delft University of Technology under the supervision of Prof. dr. ig. Margot Wijnen, Prof. dr. ig. Gerard P.J. Dijkema, and Dr. ig. Igor Nikolic. My PhD thesis and propositions can be found online, as are my publications and PhD research projects (most of which addressed how to study transitions to sustainability in the Dutch horticultural sector from a computational social science and complex adaptive systems perspective).
Additional Resources
Many of the NetLogo models I that built or used can be found here on my CoMSES/OpenABM pages.
My ResearchGate profile and my Academia.org profile provide additional context and outputs of my work, including some data sets, analytical resources and research skills endorsements.
My LinkedIn profile contains additional insights into my education and experience as well as skills and knowledge endorsements.
I try to use Twitter to share what is happening with my research and to keep abreast of interesting discussions on complexity, chaos, artificial intelligence, evolution and some other research topics of interest.
You can find my SCOPUS profile and my ORCID profile as well.

Complex adaptive systems, sustainability, evolution, computational social science, data science, empirical computer science, industrial regeneration, artificial intelligence

Valentas Gruzauskas Member since: Saturday, October 07, 2017

PhDc

The main research area is operation research in logistics with a focus on logistic cluster development and innovative technology usage. Due to mathematical background, Gružauskas focuses on quantitative analysis by conducting simulations, stochastic and dynamic models and other analytical approaches to amplify the developed theories. Gružauskas also is working as a freelance data analyst with a focus on statistical analysis, web scraping and machine learning.

Tom Briggs Member since: Tuesday, December 13, 2016 Full Member Reviewer

MPS, Industrial/Organizational Psychology, BA, Psychology

PhD Student, Computational Social Science
Department of Computational and Data Sciences
George Mason University
Fairfax, VA, USA

I use ABM to study organizations, leadership, employee behavior and performance, and the social/psychological theories addressing workplace behavior and outcomes.

I have also used ABM to explore mass violence, active shooters, and mass shootings, including the spread of mass violence and its antecedents.

Kenneth Aiello Member since: Thursday, January 23, 2020 Full Member

Ph.D., Biology and Society, Arizona State University, B.S., Sociology, Arizona State University,, B.S., Biology, Arizona State University

Kenneth D. Aiello is a postdoctoral research scholar with the Global BioSocial Complexity Initiative at ASU. Kenneth’s research contributes to cross disciplinary conversations on how historical developments in biological, social, and cultural knowledge systems are governed by processes that transform the structure, dynamics, and function of complex systems. Applying computational historical analysis and epistemology to question what scientific knowledge is and how we can analyze changes in knowledge, he uses text analysis, social network analysis, and machine learning to measure similarities and differences between the knowledge claims of individual agents and groups. His work builds on how to assess contested knowledge claims and measure the evolution of knowledge across complex systems and multiple dimensions of scale. This approach also engages in dynamic new debates about global and local structures of knowledge shaped by technological innovation within microbiology related to public policy, shrinking resources given to biomedical ideas as opposed to “translation”, and the ethics of scientific discovery. Using interdisciplinary methods for understanding historical content and context rich narratives contributes to understanding new domains and major transitions in science and provides a richer understanding of how knowledge emerges.

Andrew Crooks Member since: Monday, February 09, 2009 Full Member

Andrew Crooks is an Associate Professor with a joint appointment between the Computational Social Science Program within the Department of Computational and Data Sciences and the Department of Geography and GeoInformation Science, which are part of the College of Science at George Mason University. His areas of expertise specifically relate to integrating agent-based modeling (ABM) and geographic information systems (GIS) to explore human behavior. Moreover, his research focuses on exploring and understanding the natural and socio-economic environments specifically urban areas using GIS, spatial analysis, social network analysis (SNA), Web 2.0 technologies and ABM methodologies.

GIS, Agent-based modeling, social network analysis

Christopher Parrett Member since: Sunday, October 20, 2019 Full Member

I am a lowly civil servant moonlighting as a PhD student interested in urban informatics, Smart Cities, artificial intelligence/machine learning, all-things geospatial and temporal, advanced technologies, agent-based modeling, and social complexity… and enthusiastically trying to find a combination thereof to form a disseration. Oh… and I would like to win the lottery.

  • Applied data science (machine/deep learning applications) and computational modeling (agent-based
    modeling) in U.S. Government
  • Geographic Information Systems and analysis of dense urban environments and complex terrain
  • Complexity theory and computational organizational design of distributed enterprise teams.
  • Human Capital Management and Talent Management policy development

Fabian Adelt Member since: Monday, November 20, 2017

Computer Studies, Diploma-Degree

Fabian Adelt graduated in computer-sciences with a minor in sociology of technology (degree: Diplom-Informatiker) at TU Dortmund University in 2011. Currently, he is research fellow at the Technology Studies Group and involved in the project “Collaborative Data- and Risk-Management in Future Grids – A Simulation Study” (KoRiSim). Between 2012 and 2015 he worked on the project “Mixed Modes of Governance as a Means of Risk Management in Complex Systems” (RiskSim). His research interests entail agent-based modelling and simulating of socio-technical systems, especially focussing on governance issues and actors’ reactions on interventions. Experience covers the fields of mobility and energy.

Omar Guerrero Member since: Friday, January 30, 2015

PhD

My interests lie in the intersection of economics, networks, and computation. I am currently studying labour dynamics as a process where people flow throughout the economy by moving from one firm to another. I study these flows by looking at detailed data about employment histories of each individual and every firm in entire economies. Using this information, I construct networks of firms in order to map the roads that people take throughout their careers. This allows to study labour markets at an unprecedented fine-grained level of detail. I employ agent-based computing methods to understand how economic shocks and policies alter labour flows, which eventually translate into unemployment and other related problems.

This website uses cookies and Google Analytics to help us track user engagement and improve our site. If you'd like to know more information about what data we collect and why, please see our data privacy policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies.