Community

Nanda Wijermans Member since: Monday, October 11, 2010 Full Member Reviewer

In my research I focus on understanding human behaviour in group(s) as a part of a complex (social) system. My research can be characterised by the overall question: ‘How does group or collective behaviour arise or change given its social and physical context?‘ More specifically, I have engaged with: ‘How is (individual) human behaviour affected by being in a crowd?’, ‘Why do some groups (cooperatively) use their resources sustainably, whereas others do not?‘, ‘What is the role of (often implicit simplistic) assumptions regarding human behaviour for science and/or management?’

To address these questions, I use computational simulations to integrate and reflect synthesised knowledge from literature, empirics and experts. Models, simulation and data analysis are my tools for gaining a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying such systems. More specifically, I work with agent-based modelling (ABM), simulation experiments and data analysis of large datasets. Apart from crowd modelling and social-ecological modelling, I also develop methodological tools to analyse social simulation data and combining ABM with other methods, such as behavioural experiments.

Jessica Turnley Member since: Monday, July 13, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

B.A. Anthropology/English Lit, Univ of California, Santa Cruz, 1974, M.A. Social Anthropology, Univ of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1977, M.A. Cultural Anthropology, Cornell University, 1978, Ph.D. Anthropology/SE Asian Studies, Cornell University, 1983

I am interested in questions of method, and in the application of computational social models to a wide variety of national security questions (such as counterterrorism and counterinsurgency) as well as decision-making around complex natural resources such as water. My methods interest center on the use of qualitative social theory to inform the structure of computational social models, and the ways in which such models handle qualitative data. This raises questions around the nature of data and the ways in which computational social models convey information to decision-makers.

Tika Adhikari Member since: Friday, January 20, 2012 Full Member Reviewer

Ph D, Student

Development of spatial agent-based models to sustainability science and ecosystem service assessment, integration of agent-based model with biophysical process based model, improvement of theory of GIScience and land use change science, development of spatial analytical approach (all varieties of spatial regression), spatial data modeling including data mining, linking processes such as climate change, market, and policy to study patterns.

MV Eitzel Solera Member since: Sunday, May 21, 2017 Full Member Reviewer

I am a data scientist employing a variety of ecoinformatic tools to understand and improve the sustainability of complex social-ecological systems. I am also working to apply Science and Technology Studies to my modeling processes in order to make social-ecological system management more just. I prefer to work collaboratively with communities on modeling, both teaching mapping and modeling skills as well as analyzing and synthesizing community-held data as appropriate. At the same time, I look for ways to create space for qualitative and other forms of knowledge to reside alongside quantitative analysis. Recent projects include: 1) studying Californian forest dynamics using Bayesian statistical models and object-based image analysis (datasets included forest inventories and historical aerial photographs); 2) indigenous mapping and community-based modeling of agro-pastoral systems in rural Zimbabwe (methods included GPS/GIS, agent-based modeling and social network analysis).

Richard Harmon Member since: Friday, September 15, 2017

PhD - Economics, Georgetown Univ

Dawn Parker Member since: Monday, October 24, 2011 Full Member Reviewer

PhD, Agricultural and Resource Economics, UC Davis

Dr. Dawn Parker is a professor at the University of Waterloo in the School of Planning. Her research focuses on the development of integrated socio-economic and biophysical models of land-use change. Dr. Parker works with agent-based modeling, complexity theory, geographic information systems, and environmental and resource economics. Her current ongoing projects include Waterloo Area Regional Model (WARM) Urban intensification vs. suburban flight, a SSHRC funded development grant that explores the causal relationships between light rail transit and core-area intensification, and the Digging into Data MIRACLE (Mining relationships among variables in large datasets from complex systems) project.

Nilda Eliquen Member since: Sunday, July 19, 2009 Full Member Reviewer

MS COMPUTER SCIENCE, BS CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Social Computing particularly on data mining tweets, blogs, social networking sites for disaster events.

Mirsad Hadzikadic Member since: Thursday, January 12, 2012 Full Member Reviewer

PhD Computer Science, SMU, MPA, Harvard University

Complex adaptive systems, complexity, systems science, creativity, data mining, machine learning, economic and health systems, science education

Andrew Gillreath-Brown Member since: Thursday, July 25, 2019 Full Member

A.S., Pre-Engineering, Wallace State Community College, B.S., Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Freed-Hardeman University, B.A., Religious Studies, Freed-Hardeman University, B.A., Anthropology, Middle Tennessee State University, M.S., Applied Geography: Environmental Archaeology, University of North Texas

I am a computational archaeologist interested in how individuals and groups respond to both large scale processes such as climate change and local processes such as violence and wealth inequality. I am currently a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Washington State University.

My dissertation research focuses on experimenting with paleoecological data (e.g., pollen) to assess whether or not different approaches are feasible for paleoclimatic field reconstructions. In addition, I will also use pollen data to generate vegetation (biome) reconstructions. By using tree-ring and pollen data, we can gain a better understanding of the paleoclimate and the spatial distribution of vegetation communities and how those changed over time. These data can be used to better understand changes in demography and how people responded to environmental change.

In Summer 2019, I attended the Santa Fe Institute‘s Complex Systems Summer School, where I got to work in a highly collaborative and interdisciplinary international scientific community. For one of my projects, I got to merry my love of Sci-fi with complexity and agent-based modeling. Sci-fi agent-based modeling is an anthology and we wanted to build a community of collaborators for exploring sci-fi worlds. We also have an Instagram page (@Scifiabm).

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