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leonardo.rzoya Member since: Monday, May 28, 2012

BSc in Political Science, PhD Student in Sociology

My field of interests concerns two axes:
First, epistemology of computational modeling and simulation of complex systems. I am particularly interested in a sociological inquiry about social implication of knowledge derived from complex systems’ study.
Second, assessing the possibilities and limits of studying social complexity with complex systems tools, particularly, agent-based modeling and simulation.

Robert Axtell Member since: Thursday, July 14, 2016

Ph.D.

Agent-based computing in economics and finance
Large-scale agent-based models
Agent models calibrated by micro-data
Complex adaptive systems
Mathematical analysis of agent systems

Peer-Olaf Siebers Member since: Friday, February 15, 2019 Full Member

I am an Assistant Professor at the School of Computer Science, University of Nottingham, UK.

My main research interest is the application of computer simulation to study human-centric complex adaptive systems. I am a strong advocate of Object Oriented Agent-Based Social Simulation. This is a novel and highly interdisciplinary research field, involving disciplines like Social Science, Economics, Psychology, Operations Research, Geography, and Computer Science. My current research focusses on Urban Sustainability and I am a co-investigator in several related projects and a member of the university’s “Sustainable and Resilient Cities” Research Priority Area management team.

Matthew Oldham Member since: Friday, June 17, 2016

Bachelor of Economics (tons), MAIS - Computational Social Science

I am a Ph.D. candidate in Computational Social Science (CSS) program at George Mason (GMU). I hold a MAIS from GMU and a Bachelor of Economics from the University of Tasmania. My research interests are the application of ABMs, network analysis, and machine learning to financial markets. My email address and website is [email protected] and www.aussiecas.com

I am interested in using agent-based model to understand the behavior of financial markets

Nicholas Magliocca Member since: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 Full Member

My broad research interests are in human-environmental interactions and land-use change. Specifically, I am interested in how people make land-use decisions, how those decisions modify the functioning of natural systems, and how those modifications feedback on human well-being, livelihoods, and subsequent land-use decisions. All of my research begins with a complex systems background with the aim of understanding the dynamics of human-environment interactions and their consequences for environmental and economic sustainability. Agent-based modeling is my primary tool of choice to understand human-environment interactions, but I also frequently use other land change modeling approaches (e.g., cellular automata, system dynamics, econometrics), spatial statistics, and GIS. I also have expertise in synthesis methods (e.g., meta-analysis) for bringing together leveraging disparate forms of social and environmental data to understand how specific cases (i.e., local) of land-use change contribute to and/or differ from broader-scale (i.e. regional or global) patterns of human-environment interactions and land change outcomes.

Hassan Bashiri Member since: Tuesday, April 28, 2015 Full Member

PhD

As an Assistant Professor I am a scientific member at the Department of Computer Science in Hamedan University of Technology.
I have completed my Ph.D. in Futures Studies as an interdisciplinary field. My background comes from computer science.

Complex Systems, Social Modeling and Simulation
Enginnering the Futures

Szymon Talaga Member since: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 Full Member

MSc Psychology

PhD student in The Robert Zajonc Institute for Social Studies at the University of Warsaw.

network science; social networks; sociology; complex systems; ecological psychology; cognitive science; perception and action

Ken Buetow Member since: Thursday, November 15, 2018 Full Member

PhD, Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, MS, Human Genetics, University of Pitttsburgh, BA, Biology, Indiana University

Ken Buetow is a human genetics and genomics researcher who leverages computational tools to understand complex traits such as cancer, liver disease, and obesity. He currently serves as director of Computational Sciences and Informatics program for Complex Adaptive Systems at Arizona State University ([email protected]), is a professor in the School of Life Sciences in ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; is a core faculty in the Center for Evolution and Medicine in the Biodesign Institute at ASU; and is director of bioinformatics and data management for the National Biomarker Development Alliance.

Professor Buetow previously served as the Founding Director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology within the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute.

Christopher Hoving Member since: Monday, May 06, 2019

B.S. Fish and Wildlife, Michigan State University, M.S. Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine - Orono

B.S. in Fish and Wildlife from Michigan State University in 1996. M.S. in Wildlife Ecology from the University of Maine - Orono in 2001. Employed by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources since 2003, first as a field biologist (2003-2008), then statewide endangered species coordinator (2008-2012), and currently as the statewide (climate) adaptation program lead (2012-present). Also currently a graduate student in the Boone and Crockett Quantitative Wildlife Center at Michigan State University (2015-present). Father, gardener, hiker, and amateur myxomycologist.

Human-wildlife social-ecological systems, resilience and learning in complex adaptive systems, climate change, disturbance ecology, and historical ecology

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