Community

Dino Mujadzevic Member since: Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Ph.d., A. v. Humboldt postdoctoral researcher

Discourse and networks executing and supporting Turkish foreign policy under AK Party (since 2002) on example of Bosnia and Herzegovina; Spreading of ideas of contemporary “Turkish economic model” abroad

Rory Sie Member since: Tuesday, February 11, 2014

dr., MSc.

Mainly interested in studying social networks of learners, teachers, and innovators. Uses Social Network Analysis, but also sentiment analysis, data mining, and recommender system techniques.

Shah Jamal Alam Member since: Wednesday, July 16, 2008 Full Member Reviewer

PhD in Social Simulation, Masters in Computer Science, BS in Computer Science

My current interests include: agent-based modeling, simulating social complexity, land use, dynamic networks, social and cultural anthropology, HIV transmission dynamics, socio-political conflicts and social movements

Szymon Talaga Member since: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 Full Member

MSc Psychology

PhD student in The Robert Zajonc Institute for Social Studies at the University of Warsaw.

network science; social networks; sociology; complex systems; ecological psychology; cognitive science; perception and action

Xiaotian Wang Member since: Friday, March 28, 2014

PHD of Engineering in Modeling and Simulation, Proficiency in Agent-based Modeling

Social network analysis has an especially long tradition in the social science. In recent years, a dramatically increased visibility of SNA, however, is owed to statistical physicists. Among many, Barabasi-Albert model (BA model) has attracted particular attention because of its mathematical properties (i.e., obeying power-law distribution) and its appearance in a diverse range of social phenomena. BA model assumes that nodes with more links (i.e., “popular nodes”) are more likely to be connected when new nodes entered a system. However, significant deviations from BA model have been reported in many social networks. Although numerous variants of BA model are developed, they still share the key assumption that nodes with more links were more likely to be connected. I think this line of research is problematic since it assumes all nodes possess the same preference and overlooks the potential impacts of agent heterogeneity on network formation. When joining a real social network, people are not only driven by instrumental calculation of connecting with the popular, but also motivated by intrinsic affection of joining the like. The impact of this mixed preferential attachment is particularly consequential on formation of social networks. I propose an integrative agent-based model of heterogeneous attachment encompassing both instrumental calculation and intrinsic similarity. Particularly, it emphasizes the way in which agent heterogeneity affects social network formation. This integrative approach can strongly advance our understanding about the formation of various networks.

Morteza Mahmoudzadeh Member since: Sunday, May 10, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

Dr.

Dr. Morteza Mahmoudzadeh is an assitant professor at the University of Azad at Tabriz in the Department of Managent and the director of the Policy Modeling Research Lab. Dr. Mahmoudzadeh did a degree in Software Engineering and a PhD in System Sciences. Dr. Mahmoudzadeh currently works on different regional and national wide projects about modeling sustaiblity and resilience of industrial ecosystems, innovation networks and socio-environmental systems. He also works on hybrid models of opinion dynamics and agent based models specifically in the field of modeling customers behavior and developing managerial tools for strategic marketing policy testing. His team at Policy Modeling Research Lab. currently work on developing a web based tool with python for systems modeling using system dynamics, Messa framework for agent-based modeling and Social Networks Analysis.

Modeling Complex systems, Simulation: System Dynamics, Agent Based and Discrete Event
System and Complexity Theory

Károly Takács Member since: Monday, October 20, 2014

PhD

My main research interests are the theoretical and experimental analysis of the dynamics of social networks, in relation to problems of cooperation and conflict.

Simone Righi Member since: Friday, June 08, 2018

I received a Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Namur (Belgium) in June 2012 with a thesis titled “Essays in Information Aggregation and Political Economics”.
After two years at the Research Center for Educational and Network Studies (Recens) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, I joined the Department of Economics “Marco Biagi” of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in January 2015 and then the Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences of the University of Bologna.
I am currently a Lecturer in Financial Computing at the Department Computer Science (Financial Computing and Analytics group) - University College London. Moreover I am an affiliated researcher of the DYNAMETS - Dynamic Systems Analysis for Economic Theory and Society research group and an affiliate member of the Namur Center for Complex Systems (Naxys).

My research interests concern the computational study of financial markets (microstructure, systemic properties and behavioral bias), of social Interactions on complex networks (theory and experiments), the evolution of cooperation in networks (theory and experiments) and the study of companies strategies in the digital economy.

Edmund Chattoe-Brown Member since: Tuesday, April 17, 2012 Full Member

BA PPE (Oxon): First Class Tripartite, MSc Knowledge Based Systems (Sussex), DPhil (Oxon): "The Evolution of Expectations in Boundedly Rational Agents"

I have been involved in agent-based modelling since the early nineties with a consistent attention to methdological improvement, institutional development and empirical issues. My mission is that ABM should be a routinely accepted research method (with a robust methodology) across the social sciences. To this end I have built diverse models and participated in research projects across economics, law, medicine, psychology, anthropology and sociology. I took a DPhil in economics on adaptive firm behaviour and then was involved in two research projects on money management and farmer decision making. Since 2006 I have worked at the Department of Sociology (now the School of Media, Communication and Sociology) at the University of Leicester. I was involved in the founding of JASSS and (more recently RofASSS https://rofasss.org) and have regularly served on the review panels for international conferences in the ABM community.

Decision making, research design and research methods, social networks, innovation diffusion, secondhand markets.

Claudine Gravel-Miguel Member since: Thursday, November 01, 2012 Full Member Reviewer

M.A., Anthropology, University of Victoria, Ph.D., Anthropology, Arizona State University

Dr. Gravel-Miguel currently works as a Postdoctoral Research Scholar for the Institute of Human Origins at Arizona State University. She does research in Archaeology and focuses on the Upper Paleolithic of Southwest Europe. She currently works on projects ranging from cultural transmission to human-environment interactions in prehistory.

Archaeology, GIS, ABM, social networks, portable art, ornaments, data science

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