Community

Tuong Manh Vu Member since: Wednesday, May 16, 2018

I received my BSc, MSc, and PhD from the University of Nottingham. My PhD focuses on the Agent-Based Modelling and Simulation (ABMS) of Public Goods Game (PGG) in Economics. In my thesis, a development framework was developed using software-engineering methods to provide a structured approach to the development process of agent-based social simulations. Also as a case study, the framework was used to design and implement a simulation of PGG in the continuous-time setting which is rarely considered in Economics.

In 2017, I joined international, inter-disciplinary project CASCADE (Calibrated Agent Simulations for Combined Analysis of Drinking Etiologies) to further pursue my research interest in strategic modelling and simulation of human-centred complex systems. CASCADE, funded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), aims to develop agent-based models and systems-based models of the UK and US populations for the sequential and linked purposes of testing theories of alcohol use behaviors, predicting population alcohol use patterns, predicting population-level alcohol outcomes and evaluating the impacts of policy interventions on alcohol use patterns and harmful outcomes.

Ian Stuart Member since: Saturday, January 09, 2021 Full Member

I have only just started becoming active in research/agent based modeling.

I find agent based computational economics interesting. I would also be interested in combining agent based modeling to explore cultural anthropology, government policies, socioeconomic stratification, and the diffusion of information.

Andrew Crooks Member since: Monday, February 09, 2009 Full Member

Andrew Crooks is an Associate Professor with a joint appointment between the Computational Social Science Program within the Department of Computational and Data Sciences and the Department of Geography and GeoInformation Science, which are part of the College of Science at George Mason University. His areas of expertise specifically relate to integrating agent-based modeling (ABM) and geographic information systems (GIS) to explore human behavior. Moreover, his research focuses on exploring and understanding the natural and socio-economic environments specifically urban areas using GIS, spatial analysis, social network analysis (SNA), Web 2.0 technologies and ABM methodologies.

GIS, Agent-based modeling, social network analysis

Rocco Paolillo Member since: Monday, September 24, 2018 Full Member

BIGSSS-Departs PhD Fellow
Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences / Jacobs University (Germany)
PhD project: Residential Segregation and Intergenerational Immigrant Integration: A Schelling-Esser Model

Italian PhD fellow, fond of social complexity and agent-based modeling, applied to residential segregation and integration processes

Research Interests: Agent-based modeling, migrant integration, residential segregation

Muaz Niazi Member since: Sunday, June 07, 2009 Full Member Reviewer

BE (Hons), MS CS, PhD

Muaz is a Senior Member of the IEEE and has more than 15 years of professional, teaching and research experience. Muaz has been working on Communication Systems and Networks since 1995. His BS project in 1995 was on the development of a Cordless Local Area Network. In 1996, his postgraduate project was on Wireless Connectivity of devices to Computers. In addition to his expertise as an Communications engineer, his areas of research interest are in the development of agent-based and complex network-based models of Complex Adaptive Systems. He has worked on diverse case studies ranging from Complex Communication Networks, Biological Networks, Social Networks, Ecological system modeling, Research and Scientometric modeling and simulation etc. He has also worked on designing and developing embedded systems, distributed computing, multiagent and service-oriented architectures.

Paul Python ndekou tandong Member since: Sunday, March 24, 2019 Full Member

Mathematical modeling
agent-based modeling
coupling of agent-based models and mathematical models
machine learning algorithms
deep learning algorithms
Statistical inference
infectious diseases modeling

Jordi Sabater-Mir Member since: Tuesday, November 07, 2017

PhD in Artificial Intelligence

My research is focused on autonomous agents and multiagent systems. Specifically: Trust and reputation models, cognitive architectures, cognitive models and social simulation.

Furkan Gürsoy Member since: Thursday, August 02, 2018 Full Member

Ph.D., Management Information Systems, Boğaziçi University, M.Sc., Data Science, Istanbul Şehir University, B.Sc., Management Information Systems, Boğaziçi University

Furkan Gürsoy received the BS in Management Information Systems from Boğaziçi University, Turkey, and the MS in Data Science from İstanbul Şehir University, Turkey. He is currently a PhD Candidate at Boğaziçi University. He previously worked as an IS/IT Consultant and a Machine Learning Engineer with the industry for several years. He held a Visiting Researcher Position with IMT Atlantique, France, in 2020. His research interests include complex networks, machine learning, simulation, and broad data science.

network science, machine learning, simulation, data science.

Eo SeungWon Member since: Thursday, August 03, 2017 Full Member Reviewer

B.A. Urban Studies, UC Berkeley., MSc. Geographic Information Science, Seoul National University.

GIS enthusiast and ABM practitioner

Urban Mobility
Machine Learning
Social Network Analysis
Crime Simulation

Xiaotian Wang Member since: Friday, March 28, 2014

PHD of Engineering in Modeling and Simulation, Proficiency in Agent-based Modeling

Social network analysis has an especially long tradition in the social science. In recent years, a dramatically increased visibility of SNA, however, is owed to statistical physicists. Among many, Barabasi-Albert model (BA model) has attracted particular attention because of its mathematical properties (i.e., obeying power-law distribution) and its appearance in a diverse range of social phenomena. BA model assumes that nodes with more links (i.e., “popular nodes”) are more likely to be connected when new nodes entered a system. However, significant deviations from BA model have been reported in many social networks. Although numerous variants of BA model are developed, they still share the key assumption that nodes with more links were more likely to be connected. I think this line of research is problematic since it assumes all nodes possess the same preference and overlooks the potential impacts of agent heterogeneity on network formation. When joining a real social network, people are not only driven by instrumental calculation of connecting with the popular, but also motivated by intrinsic affection of joining the like. The impact of this mixed preferential attachment is particularly consequential on formation of social networks. I propose an integrative agent-based model of heterogeneous attachment encompassing both instrumental calculation and intrinsic similarity. Particularly, it emphasizes the way in which agent heterogeneity affects social network formation. This integrative approach can strongly advance our understanding about the formation of various networks.

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