Community

Nanda Wijermans Member since: Monday, October 11, 2010 Full Member Reviewer

In my research I focus on understanding human behaviour in group(s) as a part of a complex (social) system. My research can be characterised by the overall question: ‘How does group or collective behaviour arise or change given its social and physical context?‘ More specifically, I have engaged with: ‘How is (individual) human behaviour affected by being in a crowd?’, ‘Why do some groups (cooperatively) use their resources sustainably, whereas others do not?‘, ‘What is the role of (often implicit simplistic) assumptions regarding human behaviour for science and/or management?’

To address these questions, I use computational simulations to integrate and reflect synthesised knowledge from literature, empirics and experts. Models, simulation and data analysis are my tools for gaining a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying such systems. More specifically, I work with agent-based modelling (ABM), simulation experiments and data analysis of large datasets. Apart from crowd modelling and social-ecological modelling, I also develop methodological tools to analyse social simulation data and combining ABM with other methods, such as behavioural experiments.

Corinna Elsenbroich Member since: Wednesday, January 18, 2017

PhD Computer Science

Corinna is a lecturer in the Department of Sociology. She joined the Centre for Research in Social Simulation at the in August 2008 as a Research Fellow. Her academic background is in Philosophy (LSE, BSc MSc) and Computer Science (KCL,PhD), where her PhD Instinct for Detection developed a logic for abductive reasoning.

Currently Corinna is the PI on an AHRC Research Grant on collective reasoning in agent-based modelling, titled Collective Reasoning as a Moral Point of View. Her research interests are decision mechanisms, in particular collective decision-making, context dependency of decisions and methodological and epistemological aspects of agent-based modelling and social simulation. She has applied collective decision making to the analysis to the weakening of the Mafia in Southern Italy within the GLODERS project and published a book Modelling Norms, co-authored with Nigel Gilbert, providing a systematic analysis of the contribution of agent-based modelling to the study of social norms and deviant behaviour. Recently Corinna has been developing a teaching stream within CRESS with a periodically running short course Agent-based Modelling for the Social Scientist and the MSc Social Science and Complexity.

Hassan Bashiri Member since: Tuesday, April 28, 2015 Full Member

PhD

As an Assistant Professor I am a scientific member at the Department of Computer Science in Hamedan University of Technology.
I have completed my Ph.D. in Futures Studies as an interdisciplinary field. My background comes from computer science.

Complex Systems, Social Modeling and Simulation
Enginnering the Futures

Chris Bone Member since: Thursday, July 16, 2015 Full Member Reviewer

BA, Environmental Studies, University of Toronto

Research focuses on the coupled dynamics of human and natural systems, specifically in the context of forest dynamics. I utilize a variety of modeling and analysis techniques, including agent-based modeling, cellular automata, machine learning and various spatial statistics and GIS-related methods. I am currently involved in projects that investigate the anthropogenic and biological drivers behind native and invasive forest pathogens and insects.

Inês Boavida-Portugal Member since: Monday, October 24, 2016

PhD in Geography, research area GIScience, MsC in Territorial Managgement, Bachelor in Geography and Regional Planning

I am a geographer interested in exploring tourism system dynamics and assessing tourism’s role in environmental sustainability using agent-based modelling (ABM). My current work focus is on human complex systems interactions with the environment and on the application of tools (such as scenario analysis, network analysis and ABM) to explore topics systems adaptation, vulnerability and resilience to global change. I am also interested in looking into my PhD future research directions which pointed the potential of Big Data, social media and Volunteer Geographical Information to increase destination awareness.
I have extensive experience in GIS, quantitative and qualitative methods of research. My master thesis assessed the potential for automatic feature extraction from QuickBird imagery for municipal management purposes. During my PhD I have published and submitted several scientific papers in ISI indexed journals. I have a good research network in Portugal and I integrate an international research network on the topic “ABM meets tourism”. I am a collaborator in a recently awarded USA NCRCRD grant project “Using Agent Based Modelling to Understand and Enhance Rural Tourism Industry Collaboration” and applied for NSF funding with the project “Understanding and Enhancing the Resilience of Recreation and Tourism Dependent Communities in the Gulf”.

Matthew Oldham Member since: Friday, June 17, 2016

Bachelor of Economics (tons), MAIS - Computational Social Science

I am a Ph.D. candidate in Computational Social Science (CSS) program at George Mason (GMU). I hold a MAIS from GMU and a Bachelor of Economics from the University of Tasmania. My research interests are the application of ABMs, network analysis, and machine learning to financial markets. My email address and website is [email protected] and www.aussiecas.com

I am interested in using agent-based model to understand the behavior of financial markets

Alessandro Sciullo Member since: Monday, November 11, 2013

Political Science

Current main research interests are concerned on diffusion of ICT among social actors of territorial systems: citizens(individuals and households), enterprises and governmental bodies. Most used methodological tools are , so far, multivariate statistics and Social Network Analysis.
I’d like to apply an ABM approach in the context of my PhD research project, aimed to observe the different modes of collaboration among universities and enterprises and tehir different effectiveness in terms of creation and spread of new knowledge.

Xavier Rubio-Campillo Member since: Monday, November 18, 2013

Computer Science, PhD in Heritage Studies

My interests are focused on the development of new methodologies capable of exploring the complex relations between time, space and human behavior. Simulation, game theory and spatial analysis are some of the techniques that I use to explore different research questions, from the relation between environment and culture to the evolution of warfare.
I’m also the project manager of Pandora, an open-source ABM platform specifically designed for executing large scale simulations in High-Performance Computing environments.

Saeed Moradi Member since: Thursday, June 04, 2020

Dr. Saeed Moradi received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. Saeed has 11+ years of experience in research, policymaking, housing sector, construction management, and structural engineering. His career developed his enthusiasm for the enhancement of post-disaster recovery plans. Through his research on disaster recovery, community resilience, and human-centered complex systems, Saeed aims to bridge the gap between social sciences and civil/infrastructure engineering.

Community and Infrastructure Resilience
Disaster Recovery
Complex Systems Modeling
Agent-Based Modeling
System Dynamics
Machine Learning
Pattern Recognition
Data Mining
Spatial Analysis and Modeling
Construction Management
Building Information Modeling

Xiaotian Wang Member since: Friday, March 28, 2014

PHD of Engineering in Modeling and Simulation, Proficiency in Agent-based Modeling

Social network analysis has an especially long tradition in the social science. In recent years, a dramatically increased visibility of SNA, however, is owed to statistical physicists. Among many, Barabasi-Albert model (BA model) has attracted particular attention because of its mathematical properties (i.e., obeying power-law distribution) and its appearance in a diverse range of social phenomena. BA model assumes that nodes with more links (i.e., “popular nodes”) are more likely to be connected when new nodes entered a system. However, significant deviations from BA model have been reported in many social networks. Although numerous variants of BA model are developed, they still share the key assumption that nodes with more links were more likely to be connected. I think this line of research is problematic since it assumes all nodes possess the same preference and overlooks the potential impacts of agent heterogeneity on network formation. When joining a real social network, people are not only driven by instrumental calculation of connecting with the popular, but also motivated by intrinsic affection of joining the like. The impact of this mixed preferential attachment is particularly consequential on formation of social networks. I propose an integrative agent-based model of heterogeneous attachment encompassing both instrumental calculation and intrinsic similarity. Particularly, it emphasizes the way in which agent heterogeneity affects social network formation. This integrative approach can strongly advance our understanding about the formation of various networks.

This website uses cookies and Google Analytics to help us track user engagement and improve our site. If you'd like to know more information about what data we collect and why, please see our data privacy policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies.