Community

Geeske Scholz Member since: Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Fernando Galeana Member since: Tuesday, October 08, 2013

M.A. in International Development

I am a first year PhD student interested in applying ABM to understand the effect of formalizing property rights on the governance of land and natural resources.

Giangiacomo Bravo Member since: Thursday, September 09, 2010

Gabriel Dragomir Member since: Saturday, September 21, 2013

Eo SeungWon Member since: Thursday, August 03, 2017 Full Member Reviewer

B.A. Urban Studies, UC Berkeley., MSc. Geographic Information Science, Seoul National University.

GIS enthusiast and ABM practitioner

Urban Mobility
Machine Learning
Social Network Analysis
Crime Simulation

Ebi George Member since: Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Bachelor of Technology in Biotechnology

Grant Snitker Member since: Monday, April 21, 2014 Full Member Reviewer

Grant Snitker, M.A., is a doctoral candidate in archaeology at Arizona State University and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. His research focuses on prehistoric uses of controlled fire, settlement history, and environmental change. Snitker approaches these topics through geoarchaeology, archaeological survey methods, GIS modeling, and landscape/fire ecology. He currently works in Spain investigating the origins and evolution of early farming communities (7,700–4,500 cal. BP) and how they used fire to create productive agricultural landscapes. Snitker also applies his knowledge of archaeology and fire ecology as an archaeological resource advisor on wildland fire incidents here in Arizona. He works alongside firefighters to protect archaeological sites from wildfires and potentially destructive firefighting activities.

Envrionmental Archaeology, Fire Ecology, GIS, Agent-based modeling, Geoarchaeology

Gene Callahan Member since: Monday, March 09, 2015

PhD, Cardiff University, MS, London School of Economics

Social science modeling, especially capital theory.

S Gym Member since: Wednesday, March 09, 2016

Compuer Engineer, Master in Computer Science Student

This paper investigates how collective action is affected when the interaction is driven by the underlying hierarchical structure of an organization, e.g., a company. The performance of collection action is measured as the rate of contribution to a public good, e.g., an organization’s objective.

gepr Member since: Friday, June 01, 2007

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