Computational Model Library

Will you infect me with your opinion?

Jarosław Miszczak Krzysztof Domino | Published Tue Mar 15 17:09:27 2022 | Last modified Mon Aug 29 09:44:18 2022

This model incorporates three mechanisms shaping the dynamics of opinion formation, which mimics the dynamics of the virus spreading in the population. There are three methods of getting infected (or convinced) - direct contact, indirect contact, and contact with ``contaminated’‘ elements.

We use an agent-based 3D model to reveal the behavioral dynamics of real-world cases. The target of the simulation is the Peshawar massacre. The previous 2-D model has three main problems which can be solved by our 3-D model. Under the key action rules, our model matches the real target case exactly. Based on the optimal solution, we precisely match the results of the real cases, such as the number of deaths and injuries. We also explore the importance of adding height (constructed as a 3D model) to the model.

Disparities in access to primary health care have led to health disadvantages among Latinos and other non-White racial groups. To better identify and understand which policies are most likely to improve health care for Latinos, we examined differences in access to primary care between Latinos with proficient English language skills and Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) and estimated the extent of access to primary care providers (PCPs) among Latinos in the U.S.

The model measures drivers of effectiveness of risk assessments in risk workshops where a calculative culture of quantitative skepticism is present. We model the limits to information transfer, incomplete discussions, group characteristics, and interaction patterns and investigate their effect on risk assessment in risk workshops, in order to contrast results to a previous model focused on a calculative culture of quantitative enthusiasm.

The model simulates a discussion in the context of a risk workshop with 9 participants. The participants use constraint satisfaction networks to assess a given risk individually and as a group.

The model measures drivers of effectiveness of risk assessments in risk workshops regarding the correctness and required time. Specifically, we model the limits to information transfer, incomplete discussions, group characteristics, and interaction patterns and investigate their effect on risk assessment in risk workshops.

The model simulates a discussion in the context of a risk workshop with 9 participants. The participants use Bayesian networks to assess a given risk individually and as a group.

A model of the emergence of intersectional life course inequalities through transitions in the workplace. It explores LGBTQ citizens’ career outcomes and trajectories in relation to several mediating factors: (i) workplace discrimination; (ii) social capital; (iii) policy interventions (i.e., workplace equality, diversity, and inclusion policies); (iv) and LGBTQ employees’ behaviours in response to discrimination (i.e., moving workplaces and/or different strategies for managing the visibility of their identity).

If you have any questions about the model run, please send me an email and I will respond as soon as possible.
Under complex system perspectives, we build the multi-agent system to back-calculate this unification process of the Warring State period, from 32 states in 475 BC to 1 state (Qin) in 221 BC.

This is the full repository to run the survival analysis (in R) and run the population viability model and its analysis (NetLogo + R) of the Northern Bald Ibis (NBI) presented in the study

On the road to self-sustainability: Reintroduced migratory European Northern Bald Ibises (Geronticus eremita) still need management interventions for population viability

by Sinah Drenske, Viktoriia Radchuk, Cédric Scherer, Corinna Esterer, Ingo Kowarik, Johannes Fritz, Stephanie Kramer-Schadt

This project was developed during the Santa Fe course Introduction to Agent-Based Modeling 2022. The origin is a Cellular Automata (CA) model to simulate human interactions that happen in the real world, from Rubens and Oliveira (2009). These authors used a market research with real people in two different times: one at time zero and the second at time zero plus 4 months (longitudinal market research). They developed an agent-based model whose initial condition was inherited from the results of the first market research response values and evolve it to simulate human interactions with Agent-Based Modeling that led to the values of the second market research, without explicitly imposing rules. Then, compared results of the model with the second market research. The model reached 73.80% accuracy.
In the same way, this project is an Exploratory ABM project that models individuals in a closed society whose behavior depends upon the result of interaction with two neighbors within a radius of interaction, one on the relative “right” and other one on the relative “left”. According to the states (colors) of neighbors, a given cellular automata rule is applied, according to the value set in Chooser. Five states were used here and are defined as levels of quality perception, where red (states 0 and 1) means unhappy, state 3 is neutral and green (states 3 and 4) means happy.
There is also a message passing algorithm in the social network, to analyze the flow and spread of information among nodes. Both the cellular automaton and the message passing algorithms were developed using the Python extension. The model also uses extensions csv and arduino.

Simulations based on the Axelrod model and extensions to inspect the volatility of the features over time (AXELROD MODEL & Agreement threshold & two model variations based on the Social identity approach)
The Axelrod model is used to predict the number of changes per feature in comparison to the datasets and is used to compare different model variations and their performance.

Input: Real data

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